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Why men prefer curvy women, revealed

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NEW YORK —Why do most men prefer ladies with curvier bodies, especially sharp curvy hips? According to a study, modern man’s this preference has ancient evolutionary roots.

According to a research carried out by a team from the University of Texas (UT) at Austin and the UT – Arlington has found that for a mate, man preferred a woman with a “theoretically optimal angle of lumber curving,”  a 45.5-degree bend from back to buttocks allowing ancestral women to better support, provide for, and carry out multiple pregnancies.

“The findings enable us to conclusively show that men prefer women who exhibit specific angles of spinal bend over buttock mass,” said study’s co-author Eric Russell from the UT – Arlington in a paper published in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior.

This investigation consisted of two studies. The first looked at vertebral wedging, an underlying spinal feature that can influence the actual curve in women’s lower backs.

Around 100 men rated the attractiveness of several manipulated images showing spinal curves ranging across the natural spectrum.

Men were most attracted to images of women displaying the hypothesized optimum of 45 degrees of lumbar curvature.

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This adds growing body of evidence that beauty is not entirely arbitrary or “according to the viewer” as many in mainstream social sciences believed, but instead has a coherent adaptive logic, added psychology professor David Buss from the UT Austin.

“This spinal structure would have enabled pregnant women to adjust their weight over the hips,” the authors noted.

These women would have been more effective at foraging during pregnancy and less likely to suffer spinal injuries.

Thus, men who preferred these women would have had mates who were better able to provide for foetus and offspring, and who would have been the able to carry out multiple pregnancies without injury.

The second study addressed the topic of whether men prefer this angle because it reflects bigger buttocks, or whether it truly can be attributed to the angle in the spine itself.

Around 200 men were presented with groups of images of women with differing buttock size and vertebral wedging, but maintaining a 45.5-degree curve.

Men consistently preferred women whose spinal curvature was closer to optimum regardless of buttock size.

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Bisexual relationship can break your heart, literally

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WASHINGTON — Turns out, for men, being bisexual can be injurious to health.

According to a study conducted by the New York University, bisexual men have a higher risk for heart disease compared with heterosexual men across several modifiable risk factors.

“Our findings highlight the impact of sexual orientation, specifically sexual identity, on the cardiovascular health of men and suggest clinicians and public health practitioners should develop tailored screening and prevention to reduce heart disease risk in bisexual men,” said lead author Billy Caceres.

Little is known about the impact of sexual orientation on heart disease risk in men, despite the fact that gay and bisexual men may be at a higher risk based on modifiable factors like tobacco use and poor mental health.

In this study, the researchers examined differences in modifiable risk factors for heart disease and heart disease diagnoses in men of different sexual orientations.

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Risk factors measured included mental distress; health behaviors such as tobacco use, binge drinking, diet, and exercise; and biological risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cholesterol.

Participants who reported having angina, coronary heart disease, heart failure, heart attack, or stroke were considered as having a diagnosis of heart disease.

The researchers analysed responses from 7,731 men ages 20 to 59. Differences were analysed across four groups based on their sexual identities: gay men, bisexual men, heterosexual men who have sex with men, and heterosexual men.

The researchers found no differences in heart disease diagnoses based on sexual orientation, but the risk for heart disease was more complicated. Gay men, heterosexual men, and heterosexual men who have sex with men had similar heart disease risk.

Gay men reported lower binge drinking compared with heterosexual men, but otherwise few differences in health behaviors were noted.

Bisexual men, however, had higher rates of several risk factors for heart disease relative to heterosexual men: mental distress, obesity, elevated blood pressure, and three different measures of diabetes (medication use, medical history, and average glycosylated hemoglobin level).

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“Poor mental health is a recognized risk factor for the development of heart disease,” said Caceres. “Clinicians should be educated about sexual minority health and should routinely screen bisexual men for mental distress as a risk factor for heart disease.

This is particularly important as healthcare organizations increasingly include sexual orientation as part of demographic questionnaires in electronic health records.”

The researchers also noted that the study underscores the importance of disaggregating analyses for gay and bisexual participants to ascertain differences in health outcomes between these subgroups.

The study findings appear in the journal LGBT Health.

ANI

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