Connect with us

Health

Whole-body vibration could help combat Type 2 diabetes

Published

on

NEW YORK — Whole-body vibration (WBV), a less strenuous form of exercise, could help prevent Type 2 diabetes and, according to new study published in the Endocrine Society’s journal Endocrinology.

WBV is a technique that involves standing, sitting or lying on a vibrating platform which transmits energy through the body, making the muscles contract and relax repeatedly.

In this new study, Augusta University researchers used mice to investigate whether regular WBV would produce similar benefits to exercise.

“Our study is the first to show that whole-body vibration may be just as effective as exercise at combating some of the negative consequences of obesity and type 2 diabetes,” said the study’s first author, Meghan E. McGee-Lawrence, PhD, of Augusta University in Augusta, in Georgia, US.

“While WBV did not fully address the defects in bone mass of the obese mice in our study, it did increase global bone formation, suggesting longer-term treatments could hold promise for preventing bone loss as well.”

For the study animals were split into three different groups, receiving 20 of WBV per day, 45 minutes of exercise, or no exercise at all. The mice were followed for 12 weeks and weighed every seven days.

The findings showed there were similar weight loss benefits in the WBV and exercise group. Other benefits included greater muscle mass and improved insulin sensitivity.

It is thought the WBV technique could potentially help some people in the future who are unable to exercise regularly, such as those with diabetic neuropathy.

Continue Reading

Health

Kidney disease may up risk of diabetes

Published

on

Kidney disease may up risk of diabetes. Representational image.

KATHMANDU — It is known that diabetes increase a person’s risk of kidney disease. But, now a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true which means Kidney dysfunction also increases the risk of diabetes.

The researchers deduced that a likely culprit of the two-way relationship between kidney disease and diabetes is urea. The risk may be attributed to the rising level of urea — the nitrogen-containing waste product in blood, which comes from the breakdown of protein in foods.

“We have known for a long time that diabetes is a major risk factor for kidney disease, but now we have a better understanding that kidney disease, through elevated levels of urea, also raises the risk of diabetes,” said the Ziyad Al-Aly, Assistant Professor at the Washington University in St. Louis.

The nitrogen-containing waste product in blood comes from the breakdown of protein in foods. Kidneys normally remove urea from the blood, but it can build up when kidney function slows down.

Kidneys normally remove urea from the blood, but it can build up when kidney function slows down, resulting in greater insulin resistance as well as secretion in the body.

ALSO READ :  Excess belly fat linked to Type 2 diabetes, heart disease

“When urea builds up in the blood because of kidney dysfunction, it often results in increased insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion,” Ziyad added.

The findings are significant because urea levels can be lowered through medication, diet — for example, by eating less protein — and other means, thereby allowing for improved treatment and possible prevention of diabetes, the researchers said.

For the study, the team evaluated the records of 1.3 million adults without diabetes over a five-year period, beginning in 2003.

Out of these, 117,000 of those without diabetes — or 9 per cent — had elevated urea levels, signalling poor kidney function and were at 23 per cent higher risk of developing diabetes .

The study, conducted in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System, is published December 11 in Kidney International journal.

Continue Reading
Advertisement Cheap Air fare and package tours!
Advertisement
Advertisement Miss Gorkha  2017

LATEST TWEET

TOP PICKS