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Volkswagen fined USD 8.9 million for emissions in Mexico

Gorkha Post

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MEXICO — Volkswagen has been fined 168 million pesos (8.9 million U.S. dollars) in Mexico for selling almost 45,500 vehicles without the required environmental certificates, the country’s environmental agency said Monday.

The fine is not the last word in the VW emissions scandal.

The attorney general’s office for environmental protection said Mexican authorities are still investigating the sale of vehicles between 2009 and 2015 that may have software that lets them cheat on diesel emissions tests.

In a press release, the Federal Attorney for Environmental Protection (Profepa) slammed Volkswagen for intentionally selling Audi, Bentley, Porsche, Seat and Volkswagen cars without complying with the country’s environmental rules.

Profepa inspectors detected the breach of rules during a visit to Volkswagen last December when they checked information about the company’s vehicles, according to the release.

Volkswagen says as many as 11 million cars worldwide have the software that enables them to cheat on tests. The company says it is working to fix the cars and to change its culture so it doesn’t happen again.

Xinhua

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Health

Regular bedtime beneficial for heart and metabolic health among older adults

Raghu Kshitiz

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KATHMANDU — Sufficient sleep has been proven to help keep the body healthy and the mind sharp. But a new study on sleep patterns has suggested that a regular bedtime and wake time are just as important for heart and metabolic health among older adults too.

Researchers at Duke Health and the Duke Clinical Research Institute, in a study of 1,978 older adults, have found that people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every day.

The study  was published Sept 21 in the journal Scientific Reports.

“From our study, we can’t conclude that sleep irregularity results in health risks, or whether health conditions affect sleep,” said study’s lead author Jessica Lunsford-Avery.

“Perhaps all of these things are impacting each other.”

African-Americans had the most irregular sleep patterns compared to participants who were white, Chinese-American or Hispanic, the data showed.

Still, the data suggest tracking sleep regularity could help identify people at risk of disease, and where health disparities may impact specific groups.

Irregular sleepers were also more likely to report depression and stress than regular sleepers, both of which are tied to heart health.

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