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Video shows Samsung phone explodes in man’s pocket

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JAKARTA — A video of an Indonesian man’s Samsung phone exploding, setting his shirt on fire has been captured in a CCTV footage taken at an Indonesian hotel.

The horrific incident, that happened at the Hotel Ciputra in the Indonesian city of Semarang on Saturday (Sept 30), when the man’s phone burst into flames has since gone viral on social media in Indonesia,, the Daily Mail reported.

The man in the video, identified as hotel supervisor Yulianto, can be seen touching his phone through his shirt just seconds before sparks began flying from his pocket.

Yulianto reportedly sustained only minor injuries in the incident.

His shirt was quickly set alight, with the stunned 47-year-old seen rolling on the floor while ripping off his shirt.

The Central Java Regional Police said the Samsung phone was a Grand Duos model, which Indonesian media reported was released in 2013.

“Mr Yulianto immediately removed his shirt after the phone exploded. He had no significant injuries,” the Daily Mail quoted Agus Triatmojo, the Central Java Regional Police’s head of public relations as saying.

The incident was being investigated, police said.

In connection with the incident, Samsung told CNET that the device in question had a third-party component. The battery on the used device was not manufactured by Samsung or a company authorised by Samsung, it said.

However, Samsung Electronics Indonesia’s Corporate Marketing Director was quoted telling local media the company was further probing the incident.

“Consumer safety is our top priority, and we’ve contacted the consumer concerned to provide the necessary support, and we are currently investigating the device,” the company said.

“We sincerely wish for our customer’s swift recovery, and strongly recommend all our consumers to use Samsung’s genuine or approved batteries that have been specifically designed for use in Samsung products.”

Samsung has previously been under fire over the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 model which was recalled due to its exploding batteries.

Last year, Samsung recalled the Galaxy Note 7 after several incidents were reported where the handset was going up in flames.

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Deadly Nipah virus claims 12 in Indian state of Kerala

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NEW DELHI — At least 12 people in India have died from a rare deadly and contagious virus known as Nipah virus, according to news reports.

Four deaths were reported on Monday, including of a nurse who treated the three initial infections at the EMS Cooperative Hospital in Perambra. The death of the nurse triggered panic among hospital staff who have had their leaves cancelled to treat the sick, Hindustan Times reported

Two deaths were reported from Kozhikode and four from Malappuram district. At least six persons are in critical condition and another 20 are under observation, state health officials said.

It was recorded in Siliguri district in West Bengal in 2001 and is being suspected in Kerala now, according to media reports

Humans get infected by consuming fruit or date-palm sap contaminated by infected bats but while human-to-human transmission through body fluids is rare.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Nipah virus infection is an emerging disease that was first identified in 1999 during an outbreak among pig farmers in Malaysia and Singapore.

The virus is thought to naturally infect fruit bats (of the genus Pteropus), but it can also infect pigs and other domesticated animals, as well as humans, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The virus can also spread from person to person.

CDC says Nipah virus can cause an inflammation of the brain known as encephalitis. Symptoms can include fever and headache, followed by drowsiness, disorientation and confusion. People who are infected with the virus may fall into a coma within 48 hours of showing symptoms, the CDC says.

The virus can be highly lethal, with an average fatality rate of around 75 percent, according to the WHO.

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