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Underweight women are at increased risk of early menopause

Gorkha Post



NEW YORK — Underweight women,teenagers or in their mid-30s, are at increased risk for early menopause compared to lean or normal weight women, a new study has found.

Early menopause, defined as naturally occurring menopause before age 45, is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, and other health conditions such as cognitive decline, osteoporosis and premature death, according to a study appearing in the journal Human Reproduction.

This study followed 78,759 premenopausal women ages 25 to 42 beginning in 1989. Over the following 22 years, 2,804 of them reported natural menopause before age 45.

After controlling for smoking, pregnancies, oral contraceptive use and other factors, they found that compared with women who had a body mass index of 18.5 to 22.4 (within the normal range), those with a BMI under 18.5 at any age had a 30 percent increased risk of early menopause.

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The results showed that women who were underweight at any age (BMI of less than 18.5 kg/m2) had a significant, 30 per cent increased risk of early menopause compared with lean or normal weight women (BMI between 18.5-22.4 kg/m2) while overweight women with BMIs between 25-29.9 kg/m2 had a 21-30 per cent lower risk of early menopause compared to normal weight women.

The lead author, Kathleen L Szegda, who was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, when the work was done, said the reasons for the link between weight and the timing of menopause are unclear and that more research is needed to replicate these results.

“Early menopause is associated with several health conditions, including osteoporosis, dementia, heart disease and early death, “and has implications for family planning,” she said.

With Inputs from Agency

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Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk

IANS Indo Asian News Service




Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk. Representational Image

NEW YORK — People who are suffering from urinary or respiratory tract infections may face nearly double the risk of heart attacks and strokes than obesity, researchers have warned.

The study — led by a researcher of Indian origin — found that if the frequency of these common infections causing hospitalisation continues for a longer period it may even lead to death.

Patients diagnosed with any one of these common infections were three times more likely to die than those without prior infection after developing heart disease, and almost twice as likely to die if they had a stroke.

“Our figures suggest that those who are admitted to hospital with a respiratory or urinary tract infection are 40 per cent more likely to suffer a subsequent heart attack, and 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke, than patients who have had no such infection, and are considerably less likely to survive from these conditions,” Rahul Potluri, researcher at Britain’s Aston University, said in a statement.

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The effects of the common infections were of similar magnitude among the people suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol, researchers said.

“It is notable that infection appears to confer as much, if not more, of a risk for future heart disease and stroke as very well established risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes,” Potluri added.

Researchers conducted the study over 34,027 patients who had been admitted with a urinary or respiratory tract infection with an age and sex-matched control group without infection.

Factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, obesity and tobacco use, as well as medical conditions including excess cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and kidney disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation were also taken into account.

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