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‘Super males’ rise up out of male-dominated populaces

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A new study has suggested that males who evolve in male-dominated populations become far better at securing females than those who grow up in monogamous populations.

According to new research into the behavior of fruit flies at the University of Sheffield, the researchers found that males, who evolved in polyandrous populations, where sexual competition was fierce, are much more likely to outcompete the other males and successfully mate, regardless of the population the female comes from.

The study that appeared in Journal of Evolutionary Biology, led by Dr Allan Debelle and Dr Rhonda Snook in the University’s Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, looked at the mating patterns of fruit flies after they evolved for 100 generations in either polyandrous populations (where several males have to compete for a single female) and monogamous populations (where each male has access to only one female).

In the past, the authors had tested whether or not the courtship behavior of these fruit flies had become different between the populations.

They had found that monogamous females now prefer the courtship of monogamous males, and polyandrous females now prefer the courtship of polyandrous males – a result of the joint evolution of males and females.

Interestingly, in this study, the scientists also observed that monogamous female fruit flies seem more reluctant to mate with polyandrous male fruit flies – but yet in 80 per cent of the cases this didn’t matter because polyandrous males outcompeted monogamous males.

Dr Allan Debelle, who conducted the study as part of his PhD at the University of Sheffield with his supervisor Dr. Rhonda Snook and co-author Professor Mike Ritchie from the University of St.

Andrews, said these results also have implications for how we look at the emergence of new species: “Our research shows that when males evolve under intense sexual competition, they become more and more competitive, and basically turn into ‘super males’.

“This suggests sexual competition can have two opposing evolutionary consequences. It can make courtship behaviour change between populations, which could then prevent matings between them, and lead to more diversification and eventually new species.

“But sexual competition can also produce very competitive individuals, who will mate successfully with everyone, and act against this diversification.”

Dr Rhonda Snook, a co-author of the study and Reader in the University’s Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, added: “Understanding how new species form remains one of the most enduring problems in evolutionary biology.

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Nirmala Panta rape, murder case : Locals protest after wrong suspect paraded

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BHIMDUTTANAGAR — Locals who were protesting against the rape and murder of Nirmala Panta of Kanchanpur’s Bhimdatta Municipality, have enforced shutdown in Bhimduttanagar Bazaar on Tuesday, protesting police’s failure to reveal facts behind the murder of 13-year-old girl and parading wrong suspect on Monday.

The District Police Office, organising a press conference on Monday,had made public Dilip Singh Bista (41), of Baghphanta, Bhimdatta Municipality-19 as Nirmala’s murderer.

Locals have shut down the market area stating that police were not being able to make public the true murderer(s) as they are not convinced by the findings of police citing that Bista was mentally unsound, according to the District Police Office.

Transportation has also been halted.

Bista, a resident of Khanna Chauraha area in Bhimdutta Municipality-19, was apprehended near the scene of crime on Sunday, according to police.

Police making public the wrong suspect has infuriated the locals and fueled the protest.

The agitators including various civil society organisations and human rights defenders have been picketing the District Administration Office and staging rally on the street mounting pressure on the police to reveal the facts behind the heinous crime.

Meanwhile, it had been learnt that police have fired rounds of teargas shells to contain the agitated mob.

Nirmala was found murdered in a sugarcane field on July 27, a day after she had gone to her friend’s home to get a notebook.

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