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‘Super males’ rise up out of male-dominated populaces

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A new study has suggested that males who evolve in male-dominated populations become far better at securing females than those who grow up in monogamous populations.

According to new research into the behavior of fruit flies at the University of Sheffield, the researchers found that males, who evolved in polyandrous populations, where sexual competition was fierce, are much more likely to outcompete the other males and successfully mate, regardless of the population the female comes from.

The study that appeared in Journal of Evolutionary Biology, led by Dr Allan Debelle and Dr Rhonda Snook in the University’s Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, looked at the mating patterns of fruit flies after they evolved for 100 generations in either polyandrous populations (where several males have to compete for a single female) and monogamous populations (where each male has access to only one female).

In the past, the authors had tested whether or not the courtship behavior of these fruit flies had become different between the populations.

They had found that monogamous females now prefer the courtship of monogamous males, and polyandrous females now prefer the courtship of polyandrous males – a result of the joint evolution of males and females.

Interestingly, in this study, the scientists also observed that monogamous female fruit flies seem more reluctant to mate with polyandrous male fruit flies – but yet in 80 per cent of the cases this didn’t matter because polyandrous males outcompeted monogamous males.

Dr Allan Debelle, who conducted the study as part of his PhD at the University of Sheffield with his supervisor Dr. Rhonda Snook and co-author Professor Mike Ritchie from the University of St.

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Andrews, said these results also have implications for how we look at the emergence of new species: “Our research shows that when males evolve under intense sexual competition, they become more and more competitive, and basically turn into ‘super males’.

“This suggests sexual competition can have two opposing evolutionary consequences. It can make courtship behaviour change between populations, which could then prevent matings between them, and lead to more diversification and eventually new species.

“But sexual competition can also produce very competitive individuals, who will mate successfully with everyone, and act against this diversification.”

Dr Rhonda Snook, a co-author of the study and Reader in the University’s Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, added: “Understanding how new species form remains one of the most enduring problems in evolutionary biology.

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Couples with a good sex life are more likely to cheat, finds a study

Gorkha Post

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Couples with a good sex life are more likely to cheat. Imge for representation only

Having great sex life in a relationship has been considered one of the most important factors as that would stop either partner becoming unfaithful. But a new research has found that having a good sex life only is not enough for partners as it may make one’s partner more likely to stray.

Researchers at the University of Florida assessed how newly married couples reacted to other people and found those with active sex lives were more likely to want sex with others

The team documented their sex satisfaction then monitored their interactions with others.

The researchers also found men with a more-attractive wife were less likely to cheat than women with a more-attractive husband . The authors said this sex difference is “consistent with evidence that partner attractiveness to men than it is to women”.

“With the advent of social media, and thus the increased availability of and access to alternative partners, understanding how people avoid the temptation posed by alternative partners may be more relevant than ever to understanding relationships,” the authors said.

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They found that participants who quickly stopped looking at an attractive person were less likely to have affairs during the course of the study. The difference in the length of time of the gaze between ‘cheaters’ and ‘faithful’ people was just fractions of a second.

A person who looked at an attractive person for just a few hundred milliseconds longer was 50 per cent more likely to cheat than someone who stopped looking at the attractive picture.

As well as avoiding looking longingly at others, researchers found that faithful people also ‘downgraded’ how attractive they viewed others.

The authors say that faithful people — when asked to evaluate how good looking other people were — gave lower scores than people who went on to cheat.

At a time when potential romantic partners on social media that could tempt someone to stray is high, the authors say their research is more relevant than ever further suggesting that people who really enjoy good sex are more likely to be unfaithful because they seek out sex with more partners.

Younger people were also more likely to cheat. And men who had previously had lots of short-term sexual partners were also more likely to have an affair, although the opposite was true of women.

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