Connect with us


Sufficient vitamin D levels in childhood may cut diabetes risk

Gorkha Post



NEW YORK — Getting sufficient vitamin D during infancy and childhood can reduce the risk of islet autoimmunity as well as Type 1 diabetes in kids, a study has found.

Vitamin D has long been touted for its profound health benefits, ranging from combating asthma to warding off cancer and improving dental and bone health.

Researchers from University of Colorado in the US examined the association between vitamin D levels in the blood and islet autoimmunity. Islet autoimmunity, detected by antibodies that appear when the immune system attacks the islet cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, is a precursor to type 1 diabetes.

“For several years there has been controversy among scientists about whether vitamin D lowers the risk of developing of islet autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes,” said Jill Norris, from University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus (CU Anschutz).

ALSO READ :  High level of Vitamin D may lower cancer risk

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease that is increasing by 3-5 per cent annually worldwide, researchers said.

Vitamin D represents a candidate protective factor for Type 1 diabetes as it regulates the immune system and autoimmunity, the researchers said.

In the study, published in the journal Diabetes, the team searched for triggers and protective factors in 8,676 children with elevated Type 1 diabetes risk.

The study is the first to show that higher childhood vitamin D levels are significantly associated with a decreased risk of IA. “Since this association does not prove cause-and-effect, we look to future prospective studies to confirm whether a vitamin D intervention can help prevent type 1 diabetes,” Norris said.

In children with a genetic variant in the vitamin D receptor gene, vitamin D levels in infancy and childhood were lower in those that went on to develop islet autoimmunity compared with those that did not develop autoimmunity.

The researchers identified islet autoimmunity in 376 children and compared them with 1,041 children who did not.

ALSO READ :  Woman gives birth after childhood ovarian tissue transplant

Vitamin D is an essential vitamin our body requires to stay in the best of health, and the best source of vitamin D is sun exposure. But the best source of this vitamin for infants is their mother’s milk.

Young children can obtain optimum amount of vitamin D from yogurt, orange juice, milk and fish and short-time exposure to direct sunlight.

Continue Reading


Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk

IANS Indo Asian News Service




Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk. Representational Image

NEW YORK — People who are suffering from urinary or respiratory tract infections may face nearly double the risk of heart attacks and strokes than obesity, researchers have warned.

The study — led by a researcher of Indian origin — found that if the frequency of these common infections causing hospitalisation continues for a longer period it may even lead to death.

Patients diagnosed with any one of these common infections were three times more likely to die than those without prior infection after developing heart disease, and almost twice as likely to die if they had a stroke.

“Our figures suggest that those who are admitted to hospital with a respiratory or urinary tract infection are 40 per cent more likely to suffer a subsequent heart attack, and 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke, than patients who have had no such infection, and are considerably less likely to survive from these conditions,” Rahul Potluri, researcher at Britain’s Aston University, said in a statement.

ALSO READ :  A drug that can limit spread of deadly brain tumors

The effects of the common infections were of similar magnitude among the people suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol, researchers said.

“It is notable that infection appears to confer as much, if not more, of a risk for future heart disease and stroke as very well established risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes,” Potluri added.

Researchers conducted the study over 34,027 patients who had been admitted with a urinary or respiratory tract infection with an age and sex-matched control group without infection.

Factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, obesity and tobacco use, as well as medical conditions including excess cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and kidney disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation were also taken into account.

Continue Reading