Connect with us

Life Style

Sleep well for sexual pleasure

Gorkha Post

Published

on

NEW YORK — A good night’s sleeps revives you for the day as well as gives you an extra strength in your sex life, according to a new study.

David Kalmbach from the University of Michigan Medical School has found that every extra hour of sleep improved the livelihood of sexual movement with a partner by 14 percent.

In a study of 171 women, those who obtained more sleep on a given night experienced greater sexual desire the next day.

“If you are having issues in the room, one of the things to consider is, are you sufficiently getting sleep,” Kalmbach asked in a paper that appeared in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

ALSO READ :  Govt sets minimum wage of workers at Rs 13,450 a month

Sleep was also essential for genital arousal, such that women who slept longer on average experienced fewer problems with vaginal arousal than women who obtained less sleep.

Kalmbach said his findings covered well slept women over the time.

“The impact of sleep on sexual desire and arousal has received little attention in the field, but these findings show that inadequate sleep can diminish sexual craving and arousal for women,” Kalmbach added.

-Agencies

Continue Reading

Health

Regular bedtime beneficial for heart and metabolic health among older adults

Raghu Kshitiz

Published

on

KATHMANDU — Sufficient sleep has been proven to help keep the body healthy and the mind sharp. But a new study on sleep patterns has suggested that a regular bedtime and wake time are just as important for heart and metabolic health among older adults too.

Researchers at Duke Health and the Duke Clinical Research Institute, in a study of 1,978 older adults, have found that people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every day.

The study  was published Sept 21 in the journal Scientific Reports.

“From our study, we can’t conclude that sleep irregularity results in health risks, or whether health conditions affect sleep,” said study’s lead author Jessica Lunsford-Avery.

ALSO READ :  Budget will address people’s expectation: PM Oli

“Perhaps all of these things are impacting each other.”

African-Americans had the most irregular sleep patterns compared to participants who were white, Chinese-American or Hispanic, the data showed.

Still, the data suggest tracking sleep regularity could help identify people at risk of disease, and where health disparities may impact specific groups.

Irregular sleepers were also more likely to report depression and stress than regular sleepers, both of which are tied to heart health.

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS