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Sitting too much may kill you in 14 ways

Gorkha Post

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Sitting too much may kill you even if you exercise regularly, according to an American Cancer Society study.

If you sit for six hours a day or more, your risk of dying early jumps 19 percent, compared with people who sit fewer than three hours, the study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, suggests.

The study authors added, sitting may kill you in 14 ways, including: cancer; heart disease; stroke; diabetes; kidney disease; suicide; Parkinson’s disease; Alzheimer’s disease; nervous disorders; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD; lung disease; liver disease; peptic ulcer and other digestive disease; and musculoskeletal disorders.

“The simple message is that we should be moving more,” said lead researcher Alpa Patel, strategic director of the cancer society’s prevention study-3.

“The less sitting you do, the better it is for you,” she said, “Breaking up an hour of sitting with 2 minutes of standing or light activity can improve cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure.”

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The study however couldn’t prove cause and effect, but it’s clear that Americans are spending more time in their seats — watching TV, working and playing on computers and smartphones. With age people sit more, and people with chronic disease spend even more sedentary time, the researchers noted.

An Australian study estimated that 90 percent of non-working time was sedentary, and that more than half of it was spent watching TV or sitting at computers.

For the study, Patel’s team collected data on nearly 128,000 men and women who were part of an American Cancer Society prevention study. At the start of the study, all were free of major chronic diseases. During 21 years of follow-up, nearly 49,000 people died.

It’s not clear why prolonged sitting is unhealthy, Patel said. It’s possible that people who spend a lot of time on the couch also have other unhealthy behaviors, such as excess snacking, she suggested.

In addition, prolonged sitting has been linked to higher levels of triglycerides, blood sugar, blood pressure and insulin. Sitting has also been tied to inflammation caused by obesity.

These consequences might explain why sitting was linked with death from heart, liver and kidney disease, as well as cancer, diabetes and COPD, Patel said.

It’s less clear why death from suicide, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, as well as nervous and musculoskeletal disorders, seems associated with sitting. For these, she said, it’s possible that the conditions themselves result in more sedentary time.

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The increased mortality risk differed by disease, ranging from 10 percent for cancer to 60 percent for musculoskeletal disease, Patel said.

Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center in Derby, Conn, said, “We have known for some time now that sitting for extended periods daily is injurious to health.”

He noted that this study links excessive sitting to an increased risk of dying early from an array of causes — everything from heart disease to suicide.

“Does this mean that sitting excessively increases suicide risk? That seems implausible,” Katz said. “Perhaps depressed people lack the motivation to get up and go out. But then again, we know that routine activity is important to mental health, so some contribution of sedentariness to the severity of depression is not out of the question.”

Even though more study is needed to figure out why sitting appears to boost the risk of early death, what to do about it is no mystery, he said.

With Agency Inputs

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Women with diabetes have higher cancer risk : Study

Raghu Kshitiz

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SYDNEY — The increased risk of cancer in people with diabetes is higher for women than men, according to a major study by Australian researchers.

Women with diabetes were also at greater risk than men of getting leukemia and stomach, mouth and kidney cancers, the George Institute for Global Health medical research group said in a statement on Friday.

Previous research identified the link between diabetes and cancer risk, but this study looked at whether that risk differs between men and women.

Among people with diabetes, women have a 6 percent higher risk of cancer than men, the researchers said in the study, published in the journal Diabetologia.

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For women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the cancer risk is 27 percent higher compared to other women. And men with diabetes have a 19 percent higher cancer risk than men who don’t have the blood sugar disease, the findings showed.

And, for men the risk was 19 percent higher. The numbers “highlight the need for more research into the role diabetes plays in developing cancer” and “demonstrate the increasing importance of sex specific research,” said the researchers.

And based on the researchers’ analysis of data from 47 studies, diabetics of both sexes are at greater risk of cancer than people without diabetes.

“Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the sex differences in the diabetes-cancer association,” the study authors concluded.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 8.7 million deaths in 2015. About one in four women and one in three men will develop cancer during their lifetime, the study authors noted in a journal news release.

Similary, diabetes affects more than 415 million people worldwide, with 5 million deaths linked to it every year.

With Inputs from Agency

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