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Sex suffers when man demands perfection from partner

Gorkha Post

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LONDON – Researchers have found that setting exceedingly high standards of performance between the sheets may put your sex life in jeopardy by causing sexual dysfunction in your female partner.

The findings published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behaviour showed that partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism can lead to decrease in female sexual function regarding arousal.

The study led by Professor Joachim Stoeber from the University of Kent in Britain also found that partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism contributed to negative self-image.

Perfectionism is defined as a “striving for flawlessness and the setting of exceedingly high standards for performance, accompanied by tendencies for overly critical self-evaluations and concerns about negative evaluations by others”.

It is a common personality characteristic that may affect all domains of life. However, the longer term consequences of how it affects people’s sex life had previously not been explored. The research considered the response of 366 young women who completed two surveys in the period December 2013 to February 2014.

Those recruited to the study were told that the online survey was investigating whether “personal and interpersonal expectations and beliefs affect one’s sexuality and sexual function”.

Researchers differentiated between four forms of sexual perfectionism — self-oriented, partner-oriented, partner-prescribed and socially prescribed.

They found that partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism contributed to woman’s negative sexual self-concept and female sexual dysfunction.

They further found that partner-prescribed sexual perfectionism predicted decreases in sexual esteem and increases in sexual anxiety, suggesting that it is a psychological factor that may contribute to sexual problems in woman.

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Health

Sleeping in on weekends may help live longer

Gorkha Post

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Sleep deprivation has been found to have numerous negative effects on a person’s health. But the new study has shown that sleeping more on the weekend might help ease health problems associated with not getting enough during the week, and even reduce the risk of an early death.

The study, published in Journal of Sleep Research by scientists from Sweden and the United States, suggested that the negative effects of a few nights of short sleep could be counteracted by staying in bed over the weekend.

The from the Stress Research Institute (SRI) at Stockholm University and the Karolinska Institute discovered that people below 65 years old who slept less than five hours on weekends had a higher risk of early death after examining medical and lifestyle data from more than 43,000 adults, following them for a period of 13 years.

For people who slept for less than five hours throughout the week but slept longer on the weekends for about nine hours, there was no increase in mortality risk. But, for people who consistently slept for less than five hours through the whole week, the mortality risk is higher.

Torbjorn Akerstedt, one of the authors of the research and a clinical neuroscience professor from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said that the findings were consistent with previous studies on the link between sleep duration and mortality.

However, those previous studies only focused on sleep during weekdays.

“The results imply that short sleep is not a risk factor for mortality if it is combined with a medium or long weekend sleep,” the researchers wrote in the study.

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