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Scientists discover truth behind Yeti mystery

Gorkha Post



KATHMANDU — Scientists attempting to solve the mystery of the elusive Yeti or Abominable Snowman, a tall, hairy, ape-like creature rumored to roam the Himalayas and featured in the folklore of Nepal for centuries, have discovered that alleged remains collected in various museums are actually belonged to bears and dog.

Sightings of the Yeti have been reported for centuries, large footprints have been spotted and stories have been passed down from generation to generation.

But the scientists found nine specimens, including bones, teeth, skin, hair and faecal samples, which believed of Yeti, actually came from bears and one belonged to a dog. All the remnants, collected from the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau, were claimed to be evidence for the existence of the Yeti.

The DNA study reports of purported Yeti, which will be published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, analyzed nine Yeti specimens, including bone, tooth, skin, hair and fecal samples collected in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau.

Of those, one turned out to be from a dog. The other eight were from Asian black bears, Himalayan brown bears or Tibetan brown bears.

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“Our findings strongly suggest that the biological underpinnings of the Yeti legend can be found in local bears, and our study demonstrates that genetics should be able to unravel other, similar mysteries,” says lead scientist Charlotte Lindqvist, PhD, an associate professor of biological sciences in the University at Buffalo College of Arts and Sciences, and a visiting associate professor at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore).

Lindqvist’s team is not the first to research “Yeti” DNA, but past projects ran simpler genetic analyses, which left important questions unresolved, she says.

 She added: “Clearly, a big part of the Yeti legend has to do with bears.”

The study was the most rigorous analysis to date of samples linked to mythical “hominid-like” creatures, said the researchers writing in the journal.

“This study represents the most rigorous analysis to date of samples suspected to derive from anomalous or mythical ‘hominid’-like creatures,” Lindqvist and her co-authors write in their new paper.

The team include Tianying Lan and Stephanie Gill from UB; Eva Bellemain from SPYGEN in France; Richard Bischof from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences; and Muhammad Ali Nawaz from Quaid-i-Azam University in Pakistan and the Snow Leopard Trust Pakistan program.

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Science & Technology

Stephen Hawking dies aged 76

Thompson Reuters



The English physicist, who wrote ‘A Brief History of Time’ and was the subject of Oscar-winning film ‘The Theory of Everything’ , has died at home in Cambridge. He was 76.

The UK’s Press Association reported his death, citing a spokesman for the family.

Hawking, who sought to explain some of the most complicated questions of life while himself working under the shadow of a likely premature death.

He was considered a medical marvel, having lived for more than half a century with the devastating condition motor neurone disease.

Hawking’s formidable mind probed the very limits of human understanding both in the vastness of space and in the bizarre sub-molecular world of quantum theory, which he said could predict what happens at the beginning and end of time.

His work ranged from the origins of the universe itself, through the tantalizing prospect of time travel to the mysteries of space’s all-consuming black holes.

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But the power of his intellect contrasted cruelly with the weakness of his body, ravaged by the wasting motor neurone disease he contracted at the age of 21.

Hawking was confined for most of his life to a wheelchair. As his condition worsened, he had to resort to speaking through a voice synthesizer and communicating by moving his eyebrows.

Doctors gave him just two years to live, but he defied them and went on to be one of the greatest minds we have ever known.

Stephen was born on January 8 1942 in Oxford – where his parents had decamped from north London for him to be born away from the worst of the wartime bombing raids.

The disease spurred him to work harder but also contributed to the collapse of his two marriages, he wrote in a 2013 memoir ‘My Brief History.’

In the book he related how he was first diagnosed: “I felt it was very unfair – why should this happen to me,” he wrote.

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