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Scientists discover truth behind Yeti mystery

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KATHMANDU — Scientists attempting to solve the mystery of the elusive Yeti or Abominable Snowman, a tall, hairy, ape-like creature rumored to roam the Himalayas and featured in the folklore of Nepal for centuries, have discovered that alleged remains collected in various museums are actually belonged to bears and dog.

Sightings of the Yeti have been reported for centuries, large footprints have been spotted and stories have been passed down from generation to generation.

But the scientists found nine specimens, including bones, teeth, skin, hair and faecal samples, which believed of Yeti, actually came from bears and one belonged to a dog. All the remnants, collected from the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau, were claimed to be evidence for the existence of the Yeti.

The DNA study reports of purported Yeti, which will be published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, analyzed nine Yeti specimens, including bone, tooth, skin, hair and fecal samples collected in the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau.

Of those, one turned out to be from a dog. The other eight were from Asian black bears, Himalayan brown bears or Tibetan brown bears.

“Our findings strongly suggest that the biological underpinnings of the Yeti legend can be found in local bears, and our study demonstrates that genetics should be able to unravel other, similar mysteries,” says lead scientist Charlotte Lindqvist, PhD, an associate professor of biological sciences in the University at Buffalo College of Arts and Sciences, and a visiting associate professor at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore).

Lindqvist’s team is not the first to research “Yeti” DNA, but past projects ran simpler genetic analyses, which left important questions unresolved, she says.

 She added: “Clearly, a big part of the Yeti legend has to do with bears.”

The study was the most rigorous analysis to date of samples linked to mythical “hominid-like” creatures, said the researchers writing in the journal.

“This study represents the most rigorous analysis to date of samples suspected to derive from anomalous or mythical ‘hominid’-like creatures,” Lindqvist and her co-authors write in their new paper.

The team include Tianying Lan and Stephanie Gill from UB; Eva Bellemain from SPYGEN in France; Richard Bischof from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences; and Muhammad Ali Nawaz from Quaid-i-Azam University in Pakistan and the Snow Leopard Trust Pakistan program.

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Hoteliers asked to be sensitive against GBV

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KATHMANDU- Stakeholders have called upon the hoteliers to remain more sensitive in order to reduce the gender-based violence (GBV) taking place in hotel sector.

During an interaction programme in Tarakeshwor Municipality in the capital city on Saturday, the speakers said that the hoteliers are expected to become more aware since more cases of rapes and violence against women take place in the hotels.

A large number of hoteliers attended the interaction programme organized as a part of the 16-day campaign against GBV.

On the occasion, lawmaker of Kathmandu Constituency No. 7 Ram Bir Manandhar said that partnership among all was needed to end GBV and argued that social networking sites were responsible for the increased cases of GBV in the recent times.

Likewise, Mayor of Tarakeshwor Municipality Rameshwor Bohora pointed out the need for cooperation with the police administration as well as massive public awareness programmes to end such ill practices rampant in the hotel business.

Also speaking at the programme, Deputy Superintendent of Police (DSP) of Balaju Metropolitan Police Circle Chiranjivi Koirala urged the hoteliers to keep the details of every new entrant in the hotels since hotels are used for the purpose of women’s trafficking.

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