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Regular exercise may help people with heart disease in family

Gorkha Post

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NEW YORK — Regular daily exercise may not only rev up your fitness levels, but it may also significantly cut down risk of heart diseases that could be running in your family, according to the researchers.

Greater grip strength, more physical activity and better cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with reduced risk for heart attacks and stroke — even among people with a genetic pre-disposition for heart disease, researcher said in the the findings published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The researchers, for the study, looked at data from roughly a half-million people in the UK Biobank database. For participants with an intermediate genetic risk for cardiovascular diseases, it was revealed that those with the strongest grips were 36 per cent less likely to develop coronary heart disease and had a 46 per cent reduction in their risk for atrial fibrillation, compared to study participants with the same genetic risk who had the weakest grips.

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“The main message is that being physically active is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, even if you have a high genetic risk,” said Erik Ingelsson, lead study author and Professor of Medicine at Stanford University’s School of Medicine in California.

To reach this conclusion, researchers looked at data from roughly a half-million people in the UK Biobank database.

“The main message is that being physically active is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, even if you have a high genetic risk,” said Erik Ingelsson, lead study author and Professor of Medicine at Stanford University’s School of Medicine in California.

Among individuals deemed at high genetic risk for cardiovascular diseases, high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with a 49 per cent lower risk for coronary heart disease and a 60 per cent lower risk for atrial fibrillation compared to study participants with low cardiorespiratory fitness.

“The study is not a prescription for a specific type or amount of exercise and because the results come from an observational study, Ingelsson said, adding that “we can’t definitely claim a causal connection.”

Nonetheless, the researchers said the data is robust and the results are worthy for consideration in guidelines.

With Agency Inputs

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Lifestyle increasing cancer

Pratigya Waiju

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KATHMANDU—Smoking, chewing tobacco, poor diet and lack of exercise are the leading risk factor for increasing cancer cases.

Nepal’s two biggest cancer centers, BP Koirala Memorial Cancer Hospital (BPKMCH) in Bharatpur, Chitwan and Bhaktapur cancer Hospital (BCH) in Kathmandu Valley, recorded a total of 19,433 new cases in 2017.

BPKMCH, which started with 100 beds in 2000, recently added 34 new beds, bringing the total number of beds to 228; following a rise in the number of cancer patients.

Lung cancer is the most prevalent cancer among Nepalis, followed by cervix and uteri, breast, stomach, gallbladder, ovary, oesophagus, urinary bladder and thyroid.

Among men, smoking and drinking from early age and chewing tobacco and betel nuts are attributed as the major contributors of Ear, Nose and throat (ENT) cancer.

Both indoor and outdoor pollution are also significant factors affecting people who work in those conditions the most.

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