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Red meat linked to colon cancer in women

Raghu Kshitiz

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LONDON — Consuming red meat may increase the risk of colon cancer in women, a new research in Britain has found.

Researchers studied whether beef is associated with risk of colon and rectal cancer compared with poultry, fish or vegetarian diets, according to a research conducted by the University of Leeds, a diet free from red meat significantly reduces the risk of a type of colon cancer in women living in the United Kingdom.

If a woman avoids eating red meat, her risk of colon cancer is significantly reduced, the findings were published Sunday in the International Journal for Cancer said.

When comparing the effects of these diets to cancer development in specific subsites of the colon, they found that those regularly eating red meat compared to a red meat-free diet had higher rates of distal colon cancer – cancer found on the descending section of the colon, where faeces is stored.

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Previous studies have suggested that eating lots of red and processed meat increases risk for colorectal cancer but the researchers said there is limited available information about specific dietary patterns and where cancer occurred in the bowel.

Researchers found that regular eaters of red meat had higher rates of distal colon cancer compared with others. The cancer was found on the descending section of the colon, where feces is stored.

Lead author Dr Diego Rada Fernandez de Jauregui said, “The impact of different types of red meat and dietary patterns on cancer locations is one of the biggest challenges in the study of diet and colorectal cancer”.

“Our research is one of the few studies looking at this relationship and while further analysis in a larger study is needed, it could provide valuable information for those with family history of colorectal cancer and those working on prevention.”

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The study analysis explored the relationship between the four dietary patterns and colorectal cancer and a further exploratory analysis examined the correlation between diet and colon subsites.

Co-author Janet said, “Our study not only helps shed light on how meat consumption may affect the sections of the colorectum differently, it emphasises the importance of reliable dietary reporting from large groups of people”.

With Agency Inputs

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Regular bedtime beneficial for heart and metabolic health among older adults

Raghu Kshitiz

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KATHMANDU — Sufficient sleep has been proven to help keep the body healthy and the mind sharp. But a new study on sleep patterns has suggested that a regular bedtime and wake time are just as important for heart and metabolic health among older adults too.

Researchers at Duke Health and the Duke Clinical Research Institute, in a study of 1,978 older adults, have found that people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every day.

The study  was published Sept 21 in the journal Scientific Reports.

“From our study, we can’t conclude that sleep irregularity results in health risks, or whether health conditions affect sleep,” said study’s lead author Jessica Lunsford-Avery.

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“Perhaps all of these things are impacting each other.”

African-Americans had the most irregular sleep patterns compared to participants who were white, Chinese-American or Hispanic, the data showed.

Still, the data suggest tracking sleep regularity could help identify people at risk of disease, and where health disparities may impact specific groups.

Irregular sleepers were also more likely to report depression and stress than regular sleepers, both of which are tied to heart health.

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