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Proper intake of nutrition can make a huge difference in diabetes

Raghu Kshitiz

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WASHINGTON — Certain diet changes and proper intake of nutrition can make a huge difference to the body of diabetics, according to a recent study conducted by the researchers from Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.

The findings published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, shows that weight, blood sugars, and cholesterol levels of diabetics can be reduced by educating them about vital nutrients.

Researchers conducted classes and taught the patients about different diets with less meat and less fat and cholesterol.

“Doctors can turn their waiting rooms into classrooms. It’s simple and very effective. Patients learn about healthy food changes, and can share tips, swap recipe ideas, and work through challenges together,” stated author Neal Barnard.

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Earlier, some studies stated that dietary interventions are effective for diabetes management because unlike medications, they typically improve several health markers simultaneously.

Plant-based diets are especially beneficial because they treat the root cause of type 2 diabetes by reducing fat inside the cells, which improves insulin function. It also benefits the body weight, lipid control, glycemic control, and blood pressure.

Some medical centres also practice this by offering weekly nutrition education classes and support groups for patients.

With ANI Inputs

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Health

Regular bedtime beneficial for heart and metabolic health among older adults

Raghu Kshitiz

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KATHMANDU — Sufficient sleep has been proven to help keep the body healthy and the mind sharp. But a new study on sleep patterns has suggested that a regular bedtime and wake time are just as important for heart and metabolic health among older adults too.

Researchers at Duke Health and the Duke Clinical Research Institute, in a study of 1,978 older adults, have found that people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every day.

The study  was published Sept 21 in the journal Scientific Reports.

“From our study, we can’t conclude that sleep irregularity results in health risks, or whether health conditions affect sleep,” said study’s lead author Jessica Lunsford-Avery.

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“Perhaps all of these things are impacting each other.”

African-Americans had the most irregular sleep patterns compared to participants who were white, Chinese-American or Hispanic, the data showed.

Still, the data suggest tracking sleep regularity could help identify people at risk of disease, and where health disparities may impact specific groups.

Irregular sleepers were also more likely to report depression and stress than regular sleepers, both of which are tied to heart health.

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