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Proper intake of nutrition can make a huge difference in diabetes

Raghu Kshitiz

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WASHINGTON — Certain diet changes and proper intake of nutrition can make a huge difference to the body of diabetics, according to a recent study conducted by the researchers from Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.

The findings published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, shows that weight, blood sugars, and cholesterol levels of diabetics can be reduced by educating them about vital nutrients.

Researchers conducted classes and taught the patients about different diets with less meat and less fat and cholesterol.

“Doctors can turn their waiting rooms into classrooms. It’s simple and very effective. Patients learn about healthy food changes, and can share tips, swap recipe ideas, and work through challenges together,” stated author Neal Barnard.

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Earlier, some studies stated that dietary interventions are effective for diabetes management because unlike medications, they typically improve several health markers simultaneously.

Plant-based diets are especially beneficial because they treat the root cause of type 2 diabetes by reducing fat inside the cells, which improves insulin function. It also benefits the body weight, lipid control, glycemic control, and blood pressure.

Some medical centres also practice this by offering weekly nutrition education classes and support groups for patients.

With ANI Inputs

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Health

Regular physical activity may reduce heart attack risk even in highly polluted areas

Gorkha Post

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Regular physical activity may reduce the risk of heart attack, even in areas with moderate-to-high levels of traffic pollution, a study has claimed.

Higher levels of pollution were associated with more heart attacks, however, the risk was lower among those who were physically active, the researchers found in the study published in the Journal of the American Heart.

“While exercise is known to reduce cardiovascular disease risk; pollution can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks, asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease,” said lead author Nadine Kubesch from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

“Currently there is little data on whether poor air quality cancels out the protective benefits of physical activity in preventing heart attacks,” Kubesch added.

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Researchers in Denmark, Germany and Spain evaluated outdoor physical activity levels (sports, cycling, walking and gardening) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 pollutant generated by traffic) exposure in 51,868 adults, aged 50-65.

Over a 17.7-year period, there were 2,936 first heart attacks and 324 recurrent heart attacks.

Moderate cycling for four or more hours per week cut risk for recurrent heart attack by 31 per cent; and there was a 58 per cent reduction when all four types of physical activity (together totalling four hours per week or more) were combined, regardless of air quality.

Those who participated in sports had a 15 per cent lower rate of initial heart attacks and there was a 9 per cent risk reduction associated with cycling, regardless of air quality, the researchers said.

Compared to participants with low residential NO2 exposure, those in higher risk areas had a 17 per cent increase risk in first heart attack and 39 per cent for recurrent heart attack, the researchers noted.

With Agency Inputs

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