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Proper intake of nutrition can make a huge difference in diabetes

Raghu Kshitiz

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WASHINGTON — Certain diet changes and proper intake of nutrition can make a huge difference to the body of diabetics, according to a recent study conducted by the researchers from Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.

The findings published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, shows that weight, blood sugars, and cholesterol levels of diabetics can be reduced by educating them about vital nutrients.

Researchers conducted classes and taught the patients about different diets with less meat and less fat and cholesterol.

“Doctors can turn their waiting rooms into classrooms. It’s simple and very effective. Patients learn about healthy food changes, and can share tips, swap recipe ideas, and work through challenges together,” stated author Neal Barnard.

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Earlier, some studies stated that dietary interventions are effective for diabetes management because unlike medications, they typically improve several health markers simultaneously.

Plant-based diets are especially beneficial because they treat the root cause of type 2 diabetes by reducing fat inside the cells, which improves insulin function. It also benefits the body weight, lipid control, glycemic control, and blood pressure.

Some medical centres also practice this by offering weekly nutrition education classes and support groups for patients.

With ANI Inputs

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Diabetes drug might ease heart failure risk

Gorkha Post

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A new research has showed that the diabetes drug Farxiga might do double-duty for patients, helping to ward off another killer, heart failure.

According to the findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with their presentation at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association in Chicago, Type 2 diabetics who took Farxiga saw their odds of hospitalization for heart failure drop by 27 percent compared to those who took a placebo.

Farxiga is a type of drug called a SGLT2 inhibitor. The compound is called dapagliflozin.

The study included more than 17,000 type 2 diabetes patients aged 40 and older. Nearly 7,000 had heart disease and more than 10,000 had numerous risk factors for heart disease, Wiviott’s group said.

Patients were randomly assigned to take a dummy placebo pill or 10 milligrams of Farxiga each day.

ALSO READ :  Diabetes drug might ease heart failure risk

“When it comes to helping our patients control and manage blood glucose, the ‘how’ appears to be as important [as] the ‘how much,” said study author Dr Stephen Wiviott, a cardiovascular medicine specialist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“When choosing a therapy, trial results like these can help us make an informed decision about what treatments are not only safe and effective for lowering blood glucose but can also reduce risk of heart and kidney complications,” Wiviott said in a hospital news release.

Taking the drug did not reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular-related death, the research team noted. However, patients who took the drug did see healthy declines in their blood sugar levels, plus an added bonus: a 27 percent decrease in their risk of hospitalization for heart failure.

Their risk of kidney failure and death from kidney failure also fell, researchers noted.

Two other recent studies of this class of drugs show that they “robustly and consistently improve heart and kidney outcomes in a broad population of patients with diabetes,” Wiviott noted.

With Inputs from HealthDay

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