Connect with us

Life Style

People who need to wear glasses are more intelligent : Study

Gorkha Post

Published

on

Wearing glasses may really mean you’re smarter, according to a major study published in the journal Nature Communications. The study,the largest of its kind ever conducted, has found that needing to wear glasses is associated with higher levels of intelligence.

In the study, researchers from the University of Edinburgh analyzed cognitive and genetic data from over 300,000 people aged between 16 and 102 (all of European ancestry) that had been gathered by the UK Biobank and the Charge and Cogent consortia.

Their analysis found “significant genetic overlap between general cognitive function, reaction time, and many health variables including eyesight, hypertension, and longevity”.

ALSO READ :  Lovemaking gets more passionate after giving birth

“This study, the largest genetic study of cognitive function, has identified many genetic differences that contribute to the heritability of thinking skills,” says genetic statistician Gail Davies from the University of Edinburgh in the UK.

Specifically, people who were more intelligent were almost 30% more likely to have genes which might indicate they’d need to wear glasses.

While old stereotypes about glasses wearers being smarter are based upon the unsupported assumption that geeky types require optical assistance after straining their eyes through excessive reading, the new data suggests there isn’t such a simple case of cause and effect.

Continue Reading

Health

Adding glass of milk in breakfast can lower blood glucose

Raghu Kshitiz

Published

on

Several research studies have attempted to find a link between drinking milk and a reduced risk for experiencing type 2 diabetes and a new research has found that adding a glass of milk in breakfast is the perfect energy boost for body needs to get through the day.

According to a study published in the Journal of Dairy Science, consuming milk with breakfast cereal reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with water, and high dairy protein concentration reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration compared with normal dairy protein concentration.

H Douglas Goff, PhD, and the team of scientists from the Human Nutraceutical Research Unit at the University of Guelph, in collaboration with the University of Toronto, examined the effects of consuming high-protein milk for breakfast on blood glucose levels.

The high-protein treatment also reduced appetite after the second meal compared with the low-protein equivalent.

“Metabolic diseases are on the rise globally, with type 2 diabetes and obesity as leading concerns in human health. Thus, there is an impetus to develop dietary strategies for the risk reduction and management of obesity and diabetes to empower consumers to improve their personal health,” Goff and his team noted.

ALSO READ :  Women with diabetes have higher cancer risk : Study

Although the team only found a modest difference in food consumption at the lunch meal when increasing whey protein at breakfast, they did find that milk consumed with a high-carbohydrate breakfast reduced blood glucose even after lunch, and high-protein milk had a greater effect.

Milk with an increased proportion of whey protein had a modest effect on pre-lunch blood glucose, achieving a greater decrease than that provided by regular milk.

Likewise, a 2014 study from Lund University in Sweden published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found eating high-fat milk and yogurt reduces a person’s type 2 diabetes risk by as much as one-fifth.

Another study published in the 2011 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition tracked the relationship between a person’s dairy consumption during adolescence and their risk for type 2 diabetes as an adult. The researchers concluded that “higher dairy product intake during adolescence is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.”

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS