Connect with us

Health

No link between marijuana use and kidney disease : Study

Raghu Kshitiz

Published

on

NEW YORK — A new study has found that there is no link between occasional and relatively light use of marijuana and kidney disease — at least among younger people who use the drug in moderation.

According to a new cross-sectional study of adults aged 18-59 in the US, there is no association between current or previous marijuana use and kidney function.

“Our research provides some reassuring evidence suggesting that there is no detrimental effect of infrequent, relatively light use of marijuana on kidney function among healthy adults under age 60” said lead investigator Murray Mittleman, professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard University’s School of Public Health and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

“However, our research does not address heavy users, the elderly, or those with pre-existing chronic kidney disease,” Mittleman said in a Harvard news release.

“Research is needed to evaluate the impact of marijuana use in adults 60 and over, and among those with existing or at risk of developing kidney disease.”

ALSO READ :  Negative experiences on social media may increase depression risk : Study

Little has been known about how it might affect the kidneys.

To investigate that, Mittleman’s team analyzed data from nearly 14,000 US adults, ages 18 to 59, who took part in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2007 to 2014.

When questioned, nearly 5,500 of the adults said they had smoked marijuana at least once, but not in the past 30 days, and more than 2,000 said they had smoked marijuana at least once within the last 30 days.

The researchers checked levels of microalbuminuria (an increase in urine albumin, which is a marker for kidney disease), and they found no association between past or current marijuana use and worsened kidney function or disease.

Marijuana is widely used in the United States, according to the researchers. Marijuana use rose from 7.5 percent in 2013 to 8.3 percent in 2015, especially among people 18 to 25 years old, the researchers reported on study was published online recently in The American Journal of Medicine.

With Agency Inputs

Continue Reading

Health

Commonly used heart, diabetes drugs may help ease mental illness

Raghu Kshitiz

Published

on

Commonly used drugs to combat physical health diseases, such as, high blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes could bring significant benefits to people with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or non-affective psychoses, according to a study led by University College London (UCL).

The researchers say their findings have “enormous potential”. But they, and independent experts, say the results now need to be tested in clinical trials.

The study published in JAMA Psychiatry assessed the health data records of over 142,000 Swedish patients with serious mental illnesses — including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The starting point for the researchers was a list of currently prescribed medications that science predicts could also help patients with severe mental health disorders.

The researchers found that those patients typically fared better during periods when they were taking certain medications to treat high cholesterol, high blood pressure or diabetes.

ALSO READ :  48 districts get full immunisation status

The study focused on those patients who had either been prescribed Hydroxylmethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (HMG-CoA RIs), more commonly known as statins—which are used to reduce cholesterol/heart disease, L-type calcium channel antagonists (LTCC), used to reduce high blood pressure, or biguanides (such as metformin), used to treat diabetes.

“Serious mental illnesses, including bipolar disorder, are associated with high levels of morbidity and are challenging to treat,” Lead author, Dr. Joseph Hayes (UCL Psychiatry), said, “Many widely used drugs, such as statins, have long been identified as having the potential for repurposing to benefit these disorders.”

“Many widely used drugs, such as statins, have long been identified as having the potential for repurposing to benefit these disorders,” Dr Hayes added.

This study is the first to use large population data sets to compare patient’s exposure to these commonly used drugs and the potential effects on people with serious mental illnesses.

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS