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Myanmar and Bangladesh sign deal for return of Rohingyas

Gorkha Post

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YANGON — Myanmar and Bangladesh have signed a Memorandum of Understanding on the return of Rohingya refugees who fled across the border in the face of a Myanmar military crackdown in Rakhine state.

The deal was signed by Myanmar State Counsellor and Minister for the Office of the State Counsellor of Myanmar U Kyaw Tint Swe and Bangladesh Foreign Minister AH Mahmood Ali in the Myanmar capital of Naypyidaw on Thursday.

Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi met with Bangladesh’s Foreign Minister to hammer out a deal as global pressure mounts over the refugee crisis. Over 620,000 Rohingyas have poured into Bangladesh since August, running from a Myanmar military crackdown.

The talks between Suu Kyi and her Bangladeshi counterpart come ahead of a highly-anticipated visit to both nations from Pope Francis, who has been outspoken about his sympathy for the plight of the Rohingya.

Mainly Buddhist Myanmar, which denies committing atrocities against the Muslim minority, has agreed to work with Bangladesh to repatriate some of the Rohingya piling into desperately overstretched refugee camps.

The stateless Rohingya have been the target of communal violence and vicious anti-Muslim sentiment in mainly Buddhist Myanmar for years.

They have also been systematically oppressed by the government, which stripped the minority of citizenship and severely restricts their movement, as well as their access to basic services.

The latest crisis erupted after Rohingya rebels attacked police posts on August 25.

With Agency Inputs

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Health

Regular bedtime beneficial for heart and metabolic health among older adults

Raghu Kshitiz

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KATHMANDU — Sufficient sleep has been proven to help keep the body healthy and the mind sharp. But a new study on sleep patterns has suggested that a regular bedtime and wake time are just as important for heart and metabolic health among older adults too.

Researchers at Duke Health and the Duke Clinical Research Institute, in a study of 1,978 older adults, have found that people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every day.

The study  was published Sept 21 in the journal Scientific Reports.

“From our study, we can’t conclude that sleep irregularity results in health risks, or whether health conditions affect sleep,” said study’s lead author Jessica Lunsford-Avery.

“Perhaps all of these things are impacting each other.”

African-Americans had the most irregular sleep patterns compared to participants who were white, Chinese-American or Hispanic, the data showed.

Still, the data suggest tracking sleep regularity could help identify people at risk of disease, and where health disparities may impact specific groups.

Irregular sleepers were also more likely to report depression and stress than regular sleepers, both of which are tied to heart health.

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