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Meat-based diet improves length growth in infants

Gorkha Post

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Meat can be an important source of much-needed protein in an infant’s diet during the transition to solid foods, according to the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The researchers found the pureed meats promoted a greater rate of growth — with length of nearly one inch greater compared to the dairy-fed group at 12 months of age, with no increase in risk of being overweight at the completion of the seven-month study.

“Meat, such as pork, provides important micronutrients, is an excellent source of protein and can be an important complementary food for infants who are ready for solid foods,” said lead study author Minghua Tang, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at University of Colorado Denver-Anschutz, in the US.

In the study, a small group of healthy, formula-fed infants ate meat-based complementary foods, such as pureed ham and beef, or dairy-based complementary foods from ages five to 12 months old, increasing their protein intake from two grams of protein per kg each day before the study up to three grams per kg each day during the study period.

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“Our research suggests introducing higher amounts of protein and introducing meat, such as pork, into the diet at five months could be potentially beneficial for linear growth (length gain),” Tang said.

While the protein increased, both calories and fat intakes stayed the same between the meat and dairy groups, regardless of protein source.

With Agency Inputs

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Health

Lifestyle increasing cancer

Pratigya Waiju

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KATHMANDU—Smoking, chewing tobacco, poor diet and lack of exercise are the leading risk factor for increasing cancer cases.

Nepal’s two biggest cancer centers, BP Koirala Memorial Cancer Hospital (BPKMCH) in Bharatpur, Chitwan and Bhaktapur cancer Hospital (BCH) in Kathmandu Valley, recorded a total of 19,433 new cases in 2017.

BPKMCH, which started with 100 beds in 2000, recently added 34 new beds, bringing the total number of beds to 228; following a rise in the number of cancer patients.

Lung cancer is the most prevalent cancer among Nepalis, followed by cervix and uteri, breast, stomach, gallbladder, ovary, oesophagus, urinary bladder and thyroid.

Among men, smoking and drinking from early age and chewing tobacco and betel nuts are attributed as the major contributors of Ear, Nose and throat (ENT) cancer.

Both indoor and outdoor pollution are also significant factors affecting people who work in those conditions the most.

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