Connect with us

Marriage lowers dementia risk in old age

Raghu Kshitiz

Published

on

KATHMANDU — A new research review has suggested that getting marriage or people who get and stay married significantly lowers the risk of mental decline in old age.

Lifelong singletons and widowers are at higher risk of developing the disease, the findings published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry conclude.

In a study covering more than 800,000 people from Europe, North and South America, and Asia, they found that walking through life alone increased the chances of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia by 40 percent. Being widowed after extended co-habitation also took a toll, boosting the odds of mental slippage by about 20 percent.

“We were surprised by the strength of our findings,” said review lead author Dr Andrew Sommerlad, a psychiatrist and research fellow at University College London.

They base their findings on data from 15 relevant studies published up to the end of 2016. These looked at the potential role of marital status on dementia risk.

Married people accounted for between 28 and 80 per cent of people in the included studies; the widowed made up between around 8 and 48 per cent; the divorced between 0 and 16 per cent; and lifelong singletons between 0 and 32.5 per cent.

“There were fairly well established health benefits of marriage, so we did expect there to be a higher risk in unmarried people,” said lead author Sommerlad.

Couples living together without having formally tied the knot were still considered as being married for the purposes of the study, Sommerlad added.

Pooled analysis of the data showed that compared with those who were married, lifelong singletons were 42 per cent more likely to develop dementia, after taking account of age and sex.

Interestingly, elderly people who had divorced were no more likely to suffer from dementia that married couples.

Part of this risk might be explained by poorer physical health among lifelong single people, suggest the researchers.

However, the most recent studies, which included people born after 1927, indicated a risk of 24 per cent, which suggests that this may have lessened over time, although it is not clear why, say the researchers.

Across the different categories, there was also no detectable difference between men and women in the rates of mental decline.

Previous research has shown that people who live alone die younger, succumb more quickly when they get cancer, and are generally in poorer health.

But the “dementia gap” between married folk and singletons is even wider than the gap in mortality, suggesting that living with someone has direct benefits for the brain too.

With Agency Inputs

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Korean Pop Cover Dance Competition -2018 to be held in Kathmandu

RSS

Published

on

By

KATHMANDU- Korean Pop Cover Dance Competition -2018 is to be held in the capital on December 14 with the objective of cultural exchange between Nepal and Korea by means of dance.

The dance competition is taking place at the Rastriya Naachghar at Jamal at 1 pm on December 14. Twenty six dance groups are competing in the contest being organized by Struck Pop in association with Youth for Change.

The Invincible Events and Management is managing the event.

The 26 dance troupes were selected from total 150 groups through the first selection round held in Butwal, Narayangadh, Dharan, Pokhara and Kathmandu.

The team coming out first in the competition will bag Rs 30,000; the team standing second Rs 20,000 and the team coming third Rs 10,000, the founding director of Struck Pop, Sresh Moktan, said.

Struck Pop is a Korean dance troupe constituted in 2015. It has been carrying out various activities related to Korean dance since its inception.

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS