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Lifestyle increasing cancer

Pratigya Waiju

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KATHMANDU—Smoking, chewing tobacco, poor diet and lack of exercise are the leading risk factor for increasing cancer cases.

Nepal’s two biggest cancer centers, BP Koirala Memorial Cancer Hospital (BPKMCH) in Bharatpur, Chitwan and Bhaktapur cancer Hospital (BCH) in Kathmandu Valley, recorded a total of 19,433 new cases in 2017.

BPKMCH, which started with 100 beds in 2000, recently added 34 new beds, bringing the total number of beds to 228; following a rise in the number of cancer patients.

Lung cancer is the most prevalent cancer among Nepalis, followed by cervix and uteri, breast, stomach, gallbladder, ovary, oesophagus, urinary bladder and thyroid.

Among men, smoking and drinking from early age and chewing tobacco and betel nuts are attributed as the major contributors of Ear, Nose and throat (ENT) cancer.

Both indoor and outdoor pollution are also significant factors affecting people who work in those conditions the most.

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Diabetes drug might ease heart failure risk

Gorkha Post

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A new research has showed that the diabetes drug Farxiga might do double-duty for patients, helping to ward off another killer, heart failure.

According to the findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with their presentation at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association in Chicago, Type 2 diabetics who took Farxiga saw their odds of hospitalization for heart failure drop by 27 percent compared to those who took a placebo.

Farxiga is a type of drug called a SGLT2 inhibitor. The compound is called dapagliflozin.

The study included more than 17,000 type 2 diabetes patients aged 40 and older. Nearly 7,000 had heart disease and more than 10,000 had numerous risk factors for heart disease, Wiviott’s group said.

Patients were randomly assigned to take a dummy placebo pill or 10 milligrams of Farxiga each day.

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“When it comes to helping our patients control and manage blood glucose, the ‘how’ appears to be as important [as] the ‘how much,” said study author Dr Stephen Wiviott, a cardiovascular medicine specialist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“When choosing a therapy, trial results like these can help us make an informed decision about what treatments are not only safe and effective for lowering blood glucose but can also reduce risk of heart and kidney complications,” Wiviott said in a hospital news release.

Taking the drug did not reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular-related death, the research team noted. However, patients who took the drug did see healthy declines in their blood sugar levels, plus an added bonus: a 27 percent decrease in their risk of hospitalization for heart failure.

Their risk of kidney failure and death from kidney failure also fell, researchers noted.

Two other recent studies of this class of drugs show that they “robustly and consistently improve heart and kidney outcomes in a broad population of patients with diabetes,” Wiviott noted.

With Inputs from HealthDay

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