Connect with us

Health

Larger waistlines linked to higher risk of vitamin D deficiency

Gorkha Post

Published

on

WASHINGTON — Larger waistlines or higher levels of belly fat are associated with higher risk of vitamin D deficiency, according to a report presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018.

The study reports that vitamin D levels are lower in individuals with higher levels of belly fat, and suggests that individuals, particularly the overweight with larger waistlines should have their vitamin D levels checked, to avoid any potentially health damaging effects.

Rachida Rafiq and colleagues from the VU University Medical Center and Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands, examined how the amount of total body fat and abdominal fat measured in participants of the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity study related to their vitamin D levels.

ALSO READ :  High level of Vitamin D may lower cancer risk

After adjusting for a number of possible influencing factors, including chronic disease, alcohol intake and levels of physical activity, the reasearhers found that the amounts of both total and abdominal fat were associated with lower vitamin D levels in women, although abdominal fat had a greater impact.

In men abdominal fat and liver fat, was associated with lower vitamin D levels. But in all cases the greater the amount of belly fat, the lower the levels of detected vitamin D.

Rachida Rafiq said, “Although we did not measure vitamin D deficiency in our study, the strong relationship between increasing amounts of abdominal fat and lower levels of vitamin D suggests that individuals with larger waistlines are at a greater risk of developing deficiency, and should consider having their vitamin D levels checked.”

The researchers now plan to investigate what may underlie this strong association between vitamin D levels and obesity – whether a lack of vitamin D is predisposing individuals to store fat, or whether increased fat levels are decreasing vitamin D levels is not yet clear.

With Agency Inputs

Continue Reading

Health

Type 2 diabetics can reduce cardiovascular disease risk

Raghu Kshitiz

Published

on

With proper treatment and not smoking, individuals with type 2 diabetes can significantly reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a new study in Sweden.

Individuals with type 2 diabetes have 10 times the risk for heart attack, heart failure and stroke, and five times the risk for premature death compared with the control group.

In a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at University of Gothenburg in Sweden said that the increased risks could be theoretically eliminated.

“The study shows that patients with type 2 diabetes with all risk factors within therapeutic target range had an extremely low risk of premature death, heart attack and stroke. This is definitely good news,” author Aidin Rawshani, a doctoral student at the Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, said in a press release.

ALSO READ :  Drinking more water doesn't slow kidney disease in chronic kidney patients

For the study, researchers analyzed data on 271,174 patients with type 2 diabetes registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Register from 1998-2014 and matched with 1.35 million controls on the basis of age, sex and county. In a median followup of 5.7 years, there were 175,345 deaths.

Risk factors that can be controlled by medication, and cigarette abstinence, are blood pressure, long-term blood glucose, lipid status, renal function and smoking, according to the researchers.

Smoking was the most important risk factor for premature death and an elevated blood glucose level was the most dangerous factor for heart attack and stroke.

“By optimizing these five risk factors, all of which can be influenced, you can come a long way,” Rawshani said adding, “We have shown that the risks can be greatly reduced, and in some cases may even be eliminated.”

ALSO READ :  Sitting too much may kill you in 14 ways

In some cases, patients with type 2 diabetes have no more than a 10 percent elevated risk of premature death, heart attack and stroke compared with the general population. The risk for heart failure is 45 percent higher among those with type 2 diabetes in those instances.

In addition, the risk of complications, especially heart failure, is greatest among those under 55 years.

“This makes it extra important to check and treat risk factors if you are younger with type 2 diabetes.” Rawshani added.

With Agency Inputs

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS