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Lack of proper sleep ups diabetes risks

Gorkha Post



NEW YORK — Researchers have found that lack of proper sleep can increase the risk of diabetes, a chronic condition.

The researchers explained that past beyond temporary mood disorders and tiredness, lack of sleep can inflict lasting damage on your body.

As per the study appeared in the journal Current Biology, lack of sleep reduces the body’s sensitivity to insulin, impairing the ability to regulate blood sugar and increasing the risk of diabetes.

The findings suggest that lack of sleep causes metabolic stress.

“We found that when people get too little sleep it leaves them awake at a time when their body clock is telling them they should be asleep,” said the study’s lead author Kenneth Wright, professor at University of Colorado Boulder in the US.

“And when they eat something in the morning, it impairs their ability to regulate their blood sugar levels,” Wright noted.

The researchers looked at a small number of healthy men and women in their study.

Half of the participants initially slept for up to five hours a night for five days to simulate a regular work week.

Then they slept for up to nine hours a night for five days. The other half completed the sleep conditions in the opposite order.

Blood tests later showed that those who slept five hours a night had a reduced sensitivity to insulin, which in time could increase the risk of getting diabetes.

But when they slept nine hours a night, oral insulin sensitivity returned to normal. Still, it was not enough time to restore intravenous insulin sensitivity to baseline levels.

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Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk

IANS Indo Asian News Service




Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk. Representational Image

NEW YORK — People who are suffering from urinary or respiratory tract infections may face nearly double the risk of heart attacks and strokes than obesity, researchers have warned.

The study — led by a researcher of Indian origin — found that if the frequency of these common infections causing hospitalisation continues for a longer period it may even lead to death.

Patients diagnosed with any one of these common infections were three times more likely to die than those without prior infection after developing heart disease, and almost twice as likely to die if they had a stroke.

“Our figures suggest that those who are admitted to hospital with a respiratory or urinary tract infection are 40 per cent more likely to suffer a subsequent heart attack, and 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke, than patients who have had no such infection, and are considerably less likely to survive from these conditions,” Rahul Potluri, researcher at Britain’s Aston University, said in a statement.

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The effects of the common infections were of similar magnitude among the people suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol, researchers said.

“It is notable that infection appears to confer as much, if not more, of a risk for future heart disease and stroke as very well established risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes,” Potluri added.

Researchers conducted the study over 34,027 patients who had been admitted with a urinary or respiratory tract infection with an age and sex-matched control group without infection.

Factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, obesity and tobacco use, as well as medical conditions including excess cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and kidney disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation were also taken into account.

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