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Israeli device would let pregnant women take ultrasound scans on smartphone

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JERUSALEM — An Israeli startup, PulseNmore LTD, is in the final stages of developing a revolutionary handheld ultrasound device that will allow pregnant women to check on the health of their baby using only a smartphone, according The Times of Israel report.

The invention could revolutionize ultrasound tests and the frequency in which would be mothers check on their unborn child, especially in Israel, where women undergo 6-8 tests on average, according to Prof Israel Meisner, head of the Obstetric Ultrasound Unit at Rabin Medical Center in Petah Tikva.

PulseNmore LTD says its device can connect to any smartphone, displaying the images on its screen and sending them to the pregnant woman’s personal doctor for examination, the report said.

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“The purpose is to use it only when necessary, when there’s anxiety,” Dr. Elazar Sonnenschein, co-founder of PulseNmore, told Hadashot TV.

The device, however, has yet to receive approval from the Health Ministry. But the company says it has been successfully tested in the United States.

The Company says its device can be used for up to 25 ultrasound checks and will retailed at around US$190 once it receives certification from the Health Ministry.

That cost doesn’t include payment to the doctor examining the image. But the startup said it was in talks with Israeli health funds on the subject, since the device could save them money by making costly ultrasound tests unnecessary.

The Time of Israel

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Google+ to shut down after private data of about 500,000 users exposed

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KATHMANDU — Alphabet Inc’s Google is going to shut down the consumer version of its failed social network Google+ and tighten its data-sharing policies after announcing that private profile data of about 500,000 users may have been exposed to hundreds of external developers, the company said on Monday.

Google, however, kept silent for more than six months its discovery of a bug that put at risk the personal data of hundreds of thousands of Google+ users.

The issue was discovered and patched in March as part of a review of how Google shares data with other applications, Google said in a blog post.

But the delay until October in revealing the incident could reignite long-standing complaints from federal and state officials that tech giants such as Google are reckless with user privacy.

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Google feared disclosure would invite comparison to Facebook’s leak of user information to data firm Cambridge Analytica, the Wall Street Journal reported earlier.

The Journal reported that Google opted not to disclose the security issue at the time due to fears of regulatory scrutiny, citing unnamed sources and a memo prepared by Google’s legal and policy staff for senior executives, adding that chief executive Sundar Pichai had been briefed on the issue.

Google announced in its blog post Monday that it will mostly discontinue Google+ limiting it to only business and other enterprise customers.

The search engine giant has also announced new curbs on the information, such as call logs and contact lists, that outsider developers can gather on Android, the Google operating system used by most of the world’s smartphones. And it will also impose new limits on the data shared about users of its popular email service, Gmail.

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