Connect with us

Intel launches its first 10-Core desktop CPU with Broadwell-E

Gorkha Post

Published

on

Intel is shipping its new chip, the Intel Core i7 processor Extreme Edition which was formerly code-named Broadwell-e, for its target market of PC gamers and VR content creation professionals.

The seventh generation Intel Core processors are based on the 14nm fabrication process, a part of the ‘semi-Tock’ release, and come with Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0 for more efficient core allocation for single-threaded processes.

There are four versions in this series and the entire series is unlocked for overclocking, with the highlight being the $1,723 Intel Core i7-6950X Extreme Edition with 10 cores and 20 threads.

The company announced that these Kaby Lake processors, along with its Apollo Lake processors, have already gone into production and are aimed at a release later this quarter. Its Optane memory technology will go into production this year, it added.

The Intel Core i7-6950X Extreme Edition is Intel’s first deca-core desktop CPU – and it’s meant for gaming. It features a 3.0GHz base clock, a 3.5GHz Turbo Boost clock, and 25MB of L3 Cache.

The Core i7-6950X is said to be 35 percent faster in 3D rendering than the Haswell-E generation flagship, the Intel Core i7-5960X.

The chip giant has also introduced three other 7th generation Intel Core i7 Enthusiast Broadwell-E processors, the 6900K, 6850K, and 6800K.

The Intel Core i7-6900K ($1,089 ) has eight cores, 16 threads, a base clock of 3.2GHz, a Turbo Boost clock speed of 3.7GHz, and a 20MB L3 Cache.

Likewise, the Intel Core i7-6850K($617 ) has six cores, 12 threads, a base clock of 3.6GHz, a Turbo Boost clock speed of 3.8GHz, and a 15MB L3 Cache.  And the Intel Core i7-6800K ($434 ) has six cores, 12 threads, a base clock of 3.4GHz, a Turbo Boost clock speed of 3.6GHz, and a 15MB L3 Cache.

Intel launches its first 10-Core desktop CPU with Broadwell-E

Continue Reading

Health

Sleeping in on weekends may help live longer

Gorkha Post

Published

on

Sleep deprivation has been found to have numerous negative effects on a person’s health. But the new study has shown that sleeping more on the weekend might help ease health problems associated with not getting enough during the week, and even reduce the risk of an early death.

The study, published in Journal of Sleep Research by scientists from Sweden and the United States, suggested that the negative effects of a few nights of short sleep could be counteracted by staying in bed over the weekend.

The from the Stress Research Institute (SRI) at Stockholm University and the Karolinska Institute discovered that people below 65 years old who slept less than five hours on weekends had a higher risk of early death after examining medical and lifestyle data from more than 43,000 adults, following them for a period of 13 years.

For people who slept for less than five hours throughout the week but slept longer on the weekends for about nine hours, there was no increase in mortality risk. But, for people who consistently slept for less than five hours through the whole week, the mortality risk is higher.

Torbjorn Akerstedt, one of the authors of the research and a clinical neuroscience professor from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said that the findings were consistent with previous studies on the link between sleep duration and mortality.

However, those previous studies only focused on sleep during weekdays.

“The results imply that short sleep is not a risk factor for mortality if it is combined with a medium or long weekend sleep,” the researchers wrote in the study.

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS