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India admits to building bridges over Mahakali River sans Nepal’s permission

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India's built wooden makeshit bridges over Mahakali River

DARCHULA — India has admitted it’s mistake of constructing four makeshift wooden bridges over Mahakali River and a 150-metre long track and a 2 km foot trails in Darchula district without securing permission of Nepal.

The meeting was held in the Indian town of Pithoragarh on Monday to talk on the issue of Indian authorities constructing four makeshift bridges over the Mahakali River, a track and a foot trail in Nepali territory without the consent of the Nepali government.

Darchula CDO Janardan Gautam said the Indian officials admitted to the mistake of constructing the bridges and track without consent at Monday’s meeting.

The representatives of five gram panchayats (village councils) on Sunday, had submitted a letter to the Darchula District Administration Office seeking permission to build the road on the Nepali side, saying that it would facilitate the people of Nepal as well.

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Although the Indian authorities had written a letter to the Nepal government through Darchula district chief Janardan Gautam asking for a permission, officials say the Indian side went ahead with the construction without Nepal’s permission.

The Indian side has claimed that the bridges over the Mahakali River, which borders Nepal and India, and road in Darchula would serve the people of both India and Nepal.

Gautam informed that the Monday’s border meeting between the two countries also discussed various cross-border issues like human trafficking, criminal activities, smuggling of goods, drugs and animal parts.

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Tiger population increased in Nepal

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KATHMANDU — At a time when the number of tigers in many countries is witnessing a decline, the population of tigers has almost doubled in under a decade in Nepal, according to a recent survey led by the government.

The latest tiger census report — released on Sunday to mark the National Conservation Day — puts the number of big cats at 235, nearly double from the recorded 121 tigers in 2009, making Nepal the first country on track to meet the international goal of doubling the tiger population by 2022.

The success of tiger conservation in Nepal has been largely attributed to the country’s commitment for the adoption of innovative tools and approaches towards conserving these big cats.

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Although the number of wild tigers dropped by more than 95 per cent since the 20th century, now, for the first time in conservation history, their numbers are on the increase.

According to World Wildlife Fund (WWF), an organisation dealing with wildlife conservation and endangered species, this news can help Nepal become the first country to double its national tiger population since the ambitious Global Tiger Recovery Plan (TX2), a goal to double tiger numbers in the wild by 2022.

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