Connect with us

High diabetes can cause heart attack: Study

Gorkha Post

Published

on

LONDON — People suffering from diabetes are at nearly 50 per cent increased risk of dying from the effects of a heart attack, a new study has found.

“The results provide robust evidence that diabetes is a significant long-term population burden among patients who have had a heart attack,” said lead researcher Chris Gale, Consultant Cardiologist and Associate Professor at University of Leeds in Britain.

The findings showed that people with diabetes were 56 per cent more likely to have died if they had experienced a ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) heart attack – in which the coronary artery is completely blocked – than those without the condition.

Further, they were 39 per cent more likely to have died if they had a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) heart attack – in which the artery is partially blocked – than those without diabetes.

The study indicated that the adverse effect on survival is linked to having diabetes, rather than other conditions people with diabetes may suffer from.

“Managing diabetes effectively can reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This includes eating healthily, keeping active and taking medications as prescribed by your doctor,” added Anna Morris, Head of Research Funding at Diabetes UK — a research organisation.

For the research, the team analysed 700,000 people who had been admitted to hospital with a heart attack between January 2003 and June 2013. Of these, 121,000 had diabetes.

Even after adjusting for effects of age, sex, any other illnesses and differences in the emergency medical treatment received, the team found stark differences in survival rates.

“The research highlights the need to find new ways to prevent coronary heart disease in people with diabetes and develop new treatments to improve survival after a heart attack,” explained Mike Knapton, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation.

The results were published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

IANS

Continue Reading

Health

Sleeping in on weekends may help live longer

Gorkha Post

Published

on

Sleep deprivation has been found to have numerous negative effects on a person’s health. But the new study has shown that sleeping more on the weekend might help ease health problems associated with not getting enough during the week, and even reduce the risk of an early death.

The study, published in Journal of Sleep Research by scientists from Sweden and the United States, suggested that the negative effects of a few nights of short sleep could be counteracted by staying in bed over the weekend.

The from the Stress Research Institute (SRI) at Stockholm University and the Karolinska Institute discovered that people below 65 years old who slept less than five hours on weekends had a higher risk of early death after examining medical and lifestyle data from more than 43,000 adults, following them for a period of 13 years.

For people who slept for less than five hours throughout the week but slept longer on the weekends for about nine hours, there was no increase in mortality risk. But, for people who consistently slept for less than five hours through the whole week, the mortality risk is higher.

Torbjorn Akerstedt, one of the authors of the research and a clinical neuroscience professor from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, said that the findings were consistent with previous studies on the link between sleep duration and mortality.

However, those previous studies only focused on sleep during weekdays.

“The results imply that short sleep is not a risk factor for mortality if it is combined with a medium or long weekend sleep,” the researchers wrote in the study.

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS