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Govt to provide Rs 500,000 to cancer patient for treatment

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BHAKTAPUR — Health Minister Gagan Thapa has said the government is working on a plan to provide financial assistance of Rs 500,000 to cancer patients in the country.

Speaking at a programme organised at the Bhaktapur Cancer Hospital operated Nepal Cancer Alleviation Organisation on Monday, the Health Minister said the government was preparing to increase the assistance amount being given to cancer patients so that their treatment would become easier.

Currently, the government provides Rs 100,000 to a cancer patient belonging to the poor and indigent communities .

“Treatment of cancer is costly. The Ministry has proposed the Finance Ministry to increase the amount of monetary assistance being provided to cancer patients and it is awaiting an approval from there ( Finance Ministry) to implement its plan,” he added.

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Stating that the government had laid its focus on making the citizens health conscious and encouraging them to adopt healthy habits so as to prevent them from becoming ill, the Health Minister said the government was working to increase efficiency of the government-run hospitals across the country for the relief of patients of chronic diseases.

Besides, the government has extended the services of the Gangalal National Heart Center to outside the Kathmandu Valley. Center’s services are being rendered from the Bheri Zonal Hospital Hospital, Nepalgunj and a cancer hospital in commemoration of the late Girija Prasad Koirala has been established in Nepalgunj, according to Minister Thapa.

He further said the government was preparing to introduce a health insurance proposal to a meeting of the Council of Ministers to be held on April 20 , seeking its endorsement and the health insurance of all citizens will be mandatory from the next fiscal year.

He pledged to financially assist the hospital to purchase required technical materials and equipments.

On the occasion, couple Chinikaji Shrestha and Shanta Devi Shrestha of Bagbazar, Kathmandu who contributed Rs 40 million to construct the new infrastructure at the Hospital feted.

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Kidney disease may up risk of diabetes

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Kidney disease may up risk of diabetes. Representational image.

KATHMANDU — It is known that diabetes increase a person’s risk of kidney disease. But, now a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true which means Kidney dysfunction also increases the risk of diabetes.

The researchers deduced that a likely culprit of the two-way relationship between kidney disease and diabetes is urea. The risk may be attributed to the rising level of urea — the nitrogen-containing waste product in blood, which comes from the breakdown of protein in foods.

“We have known for a long time that diabetes is a major risk factor for kidney disease, but now we have a better understanding that kidney disease, through elevated levels of urea, also raises the risk of diabetes,” said the Ziyad Al-Aly, Assistant Professor at the Washington University in St. Louis.

The nitrogen-containing waste product in blood comes from the breakdown of protein in foods. Kidneys normally remove urea from the blood, but it can build up when kidney function slows down.

Kidneys normally remove urea from the blood, but it can build up when kidney function slows down, resulting in greater insulin resistance as well as secretion in the body.

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“When urea builds up in the blood because of kidney dysfunction, it often results in increased insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion,” Ziyad added.

The findings are significant because urea levels can be lowered through medication, diet — for example, by eating less protein — and other means, thereby allowing for improved treatment and possible prevention of diabetes, the researchers said.

For the study, the team evaluated the records of 1.3 million adults without diabetes over a five-year period, beginning in 2003.

Out of these, 117,000 of those without diabetes — or 9 per cent — had elevated urea levels, signalling poor kidney function and were at 23 per cent higher risk of developing diabetes .

The study, conducted in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System, is published December 11 in Kidney International journal.

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