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Eggs don’t increase cardiovascular risk for people with diabetes

Raghu Kshitiz

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KATHMANDU — Consuming eggs don’t increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes, according to a study in Australia that disprove the belief that eating eggs is harmful for heart health of patients of Type-2 diabetes.

Researchers at the University of Sidney’s Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise and Eating Disorders have found that eating up to 12 eggs per week for a year did not lead to increased heart disease.

Their findings, conducted over a period of 12 months during which the participants were put on a high egg (upto 12 eggs per week) diet or a low-egg (less than two eggs per week) diet, were published Monday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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In a previous study published in 2015, the researchers found the number of eggs was safe during three months that researchers monitored cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure in participants. The new study was longer term, but conducted with the same participants between January 2013 and July 2014.

“Despite differing advice around safe levels of egg consumption for people with pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes, our research indicates people do not need to hold back from eating eggs if this is part of a healthy diet,” Dr Nick Fuller of the the University of Sydney said in a press release.

“A healthy diet as prescribed in this study emphasized replacing saturated fats [such as butter] with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats such as avocado and olive oil.”

The study included 128 participants diagnosed with prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes 18 years and old.

Participants, for the first three months, were asked to aim for a stable weight while adopting either a high-egg diet or a low-egg diet. At the end of the three months, no increase in the markers of cardiovascular diseases was observed.

Participants, while maintaining their weight, were broken into two groups — 66 participatns ate 12 eggs per week, and 62 participants ate less than two eggs per week. There was no difference in cardiovascular risk markers identified at the end of three months.

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For the next three months, the participants aimed at weight loss while still being on either high or low-egg diets. For another six months, the researchers followed up with the participants who followed the same diets, without showing any sign of increase in cardiovascular risk factors.

Participants kept the same egg diet for an additional three months, and then another six months. In every stage, both groups had no adverse changes to cardiovascular risk markers, while also extending equivalent weight loss. Their goal was 500 calories less than their estimated energy requirements for weight maintenance.

The researchers said the new study supports the assumed health benefits of eggs, including being a source of protein and micronutrients that support a broad range of health factors, including the intake of fat and carbohydrates, eye and heart health, health blood vessels and health pregnancies.

With Agency Inputs

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Health

Lifestyle increasing cancer

Pratigya Waiju

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KATHMANDU—Smoking, chewing tobacco, poor diet and lack of exercise are the leading risk factor for increasing cancer cases.

Nepal’s two biggest cancer centers, BP Koirala Memorial Cancer Hospital (BPKMCH) in Bharatpur, Chitwan and Bhaktapur cancer Hospital (BCH) in Kathmandu Valley, recorded a total of 19,433 new cases in 2017.

BPKMCH, which started with 100 beds in 2000, recently added 34 new beds, bringing the total number of beds to 228; following a rise in the number of cancer patients.

Lung cancer is the most prevalent cancer among Nepalis, followed by cervix and uteri, breast, stomach, gallbladder, ovary, oesophagus, urinary bladder and thyroid.

Among men, smoking and drinking from early age and chewing tobacco and betel nuts are attributed as the major contributors of Ear, Nose and throat (ENT) cancer.

Both indoor and outdoor pollution are also significant factors affecting people who work in those conditions the most.

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