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Eggs don’t increase cardiovascular risk for people with diabetes

Raghu Kshitiz

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KATHMANDU — Consuming eggs don’t increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes, according to a study in Australia that disprove the belief that eating eggs is harmful for heart health of patients of Type-2 diabetes.

Researchers at the University of Sidney’s Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise and Eating Disorders have found that eating up to 12 eggs per week for a year did not lead to increased heart disease.

Their findings, conducted over a period of 12 months during which the participants were put on a high egg (upto 12 eggs per week) diet or a low-egg (less than two eggs per week) diet, were published Monday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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In a previous study published in 2015, the researchers found the number of eggs was safe during three months that researchers monitored cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure in participants. The new study was longer term, but conducted with the same participants between January 2013 and July 2014.

“Despite differing advice around safe levels of egg consumption for people with pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes, our research indicates people do not need to hold back from eating eggs if this is part of a healthy diet,” Dr Nick Fuller of the the University of Sydney said in a press release.

“A healthy diet as prescribed in this study emphasized replacing saturated fats [such as butter] with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats such as avocado and olive oil.”

The study included 128 participants diagnosed with prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes 18 years and old.

Participants, for the first three months, were asked to aim for a stable weight while adopting either a high-egg diet or a low-egg diet. At the end of the three months, no increase in the markers of cardiovascular diseases was observed.

Participants, while maintaining their weight, were broken into two groups — 66 participatns ate 12 eggs per week, and 62 participants ate less than two eggs per week. There was no difference in cardiovascular risk markers identified at the end of three months.

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For the next three months, the participants aimed at weight loss while still being on either high or low-egg diets. For another six months, the researchers followed up with the participants who followed the same diets, without showing any sign of increase in cardiovascular risk factors.

Participants kept the same egg diet for an additional three months, and then another six months. In every stage, both groups had no adverse changes to cardiovascular risk markers, while also extending equivalent weight loss. Their goal was 500 calories less than their estimated energy requirements for weight maintenance.

The researchers said the new study supports the assumed health benefits of eggs, including being a source of protein and micronutrients that support a broad range of health factors, including the intake of fat and carbohydrates, eye and heart health, health blood vessels and health pregnancies.

With Agency Inputs

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Diabetes drug might ease heart failure risk

Gorkha Post

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A new research has showed that the diabetes drug Farxiga might do double-duty for patients, helping to ward off another killer, heart failure.

According to the findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with their presentation at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association in Chicago, Type 2 diabetics who took Farxiga saw their odds of hospitalization for heart failure drop by 27 percent compared to those who took a placebo.

Farxiga is a type of drug called a SGLT2 inhibitor. The compound is called dapagliflozin.

The study included more than 17,000 type 2 diabetes patients aged 40 and older. Nearly 7,000 had heart disease and more than 10,000 had numerous risk factors for heart disease, Wiviott’s group said.

Patients were randomly assigned to take a dummy placebo pill or 10 milligrams of Farxiga each day.

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“When it comes to helping our patients control and manage blood glucose, the ‘how’ appears to be as important [as] the ‘how much,” said study author Dr Stephen Wiviott, a cardiovascular medicine specialist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“When choosing a therapy, trial results like these can help us make an informed decision about what treatments are not only safe and effective for lowering blood glucose but can also reduce risk of heart and kidney complications,” Wiviott said in a hospital news release.

Taking the drug did not reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular-related death, the research team noted. However, patients who took the drug did see healthy declines in their blood sugar levels, plus an added bonus: a 27 percent decrease in their risk of hospitalization for heart failure.

Their risk of kidney failure and death from kidney failure also fell, researchers noted.

Two other recent studies of this class of drugs show that they “robustly and consistently improve heart and kidney outcomes in a broad population of patients with diabetes,” Wiviott noted.

With Inputs from HealthDay

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