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Eggs don’t increase cardiovascular risk for people with diabetes

Raghu Kshitiz

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KATHMANDU — Consuming eggs don’t increase cardiovascular risk factors in people with pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes, according to a study in Australia that disprove the belief that eating eggs is harmful for heart health of patients of Type-2 diabetes.

Researchers at the University of Sidney’s Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise and Eating Disorders have found that eating up to 12 eggs per week for a year did not lead to increased heart disease.

Their findings, conducted over a period of 12 months during which the participants were put on a high egg (upto 12 eggs per week) diet or a low-egg (less than two eggs per week) diet, were published Monday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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In a previous study published in 2015, the researchers found the number of eggs was safe during three months that researchers monitored cholesterol, blood sugar and blood pressure in participants. The new study was longer term, but conducted with the same participants between January 2013 and July 2014.

“Despite differing advice around safe levels of egg consumption for people with pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes, our research indicates people do not need to hold back from eating eggs if this is part of a healthy diet,” Dr Nick Fuller of the the University of Sydney said in a press release.

“A healthy diet as prescribed in this study emphasized replacing saturated fats [such as butter] with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats such as avocado and olive oil.”

The study included 128 participants diagnosed with prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes 18 years and old.

Participants, for the first three months, were asked to aim for a stable weight while adopting either a high-egg diet or a low-egg diet. At the end of the three months, no increase in the markers of cardiovascular diseases was observed.

Participants, while maintaining their weight, were broken into two groups — 66 participatns ate 12 eggs per week, and 62 participants ate less than two eggs per week. There was no difference in cardiovascular risk markers identified at the end of three months.

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For the next three months, the participants aimed at weight loss while still being on either high or low-egg diets. For another six months, the researchers followed up with the participants who followed the same diets, without showing any sign of increase in cardiovascular risk factors.

Participants kept the same egg diet for an additional three months, and then another six months. In every stage, both groups had no adverse changes to cardiovascular risk markers, while also extending equivalent weight loss. Their goal was 500 calories less than their estimated energy requirements for weight maintenance.

The researchers said the new study supports the assumed health benefits of eggs, including being a source of protein and micronutrients that support a broad range of health factors, including the intake of fat and carbohydrates, eye and heart health, health blood vessels and health pregnancies.

With Agency Inputs

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Women with diabetes have higher cancer risk : Study

Raghu Kshitiz

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SYDNEY — The increased risk of cancer in people with diabetes is higher for women than men, according to a major study by Australian researchers.

Women with diabetes were also at greater risk than men of getting leukemia and stomach, mouth and kidney cancers, the George Institute for Global Health medical research group said in a statement on Friday.

Previous research identified the link between diabetes and cancer risk, but this study looked at whether that risk differs between men and women.

Among people with diabetes, women have a 6 percent higher risk of cancer than men, the researchers said in the study, published in the journal Diabetologia.

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For women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the cancer risk is 27 percent higher compared to other women. And men with diabetes have a 19 percent higher cancer risk than men who don’t have the blood sugar disease, the findings showed.

And, for men the risk was 19 percent higher. The numbers “highlight the need for more research into the role diabetes plays in developing cancer” and “demonstrate the increasing importance of sex specific research,” said the researchers.

And based on the researchers’ analysis of data from 47 studies, diabetics of both sexes are at greater risk of cancer than people without diabetes.

“Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the sex differences in the diabetes-cancer association,” the study authors concluded.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 8.7 million deaths in 2015. About one in four women and one in three men will develop cancer during their lifetime, the study authors noted in a journal news release.

Similary, diabetes affects more than 415 million people worldwide, with 5 million deaths linked to it every year.

With Inputs from Agency

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