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Eating potassium-rich foods may save diabetic’s heart, kidneys

Gorkha Post



WASHINGTON — A new study has suggested that consuming daily a potassium-rich foods may save the heart and kidneys of patients with type 2 diabetes.

People with type 2 diabetes are at great risk of developing kidney failure and heart disease. To examine whether higher intake sodium and potassium are associated with these risks, Shin-ichi Araki from Shiga University of Medical Science, in Japan and his colleagues studied a group of 623 patients with type 2 diabetes and normal kidney function.

Patients were enrolled between 1996 and 2003 and were followed-up until 2013.

Higher levels of urinary potassium excretion, which closely correlate with intake amounts, were linked with a slower decline of kidney function and a lower incidence of cardiovascular complications.

Sodium levels were not associated with kidney or heart health during follow-up.

For many individuals with diabetes, the most challenging part of a treatment plan is to determine what to eat.

The results in the study highlight the importance of a diet high in diabetes nutrition therapy, noted Araki.

The study will appear in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN).

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Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk

IANS Indo Asian News Service




Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk. Representational Image

NEW YORK — People who are suffering from urinary or respiratory tract infections may face nearly double the risk of heart attacks and strokes than obesity, researchers have warned.

The study — led by a researcher of Indian origin — found that if the frequency of these common infections causing hospitalisation continues for a longer period it may even lead to death.

Patients diagnosed with any one of these common infections were three times more likely to die than those without prior infection after developing heart disease, and almost twice as likely to die if they had a stroke.

“Our figures suggest that those who are admitted to hospital with a respiratory or urinary tract infection are 40 per cent more likely to suffer a subsequent heart attack, and 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke, than patients who have had no such infection, and are considerably less likely to survive from these conditions,” Rahul Potluri, researcher at Britain’s Aston University, said in a statement.

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The effects of the common infections were of similar magnitude among the people suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol, researchers said.

“It is notable that infection appears to confer as much, if not more, of a risk for future heart disease and stroke as very well established risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes,” Potluri added.

Researchers conducted the study over 34,027 patients who had been admitted with a urinary or respiratory tract infection with an age and sex-matched control group without infection.

Factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, obesity and tobacco use, as well as medical conditions including excess cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and kidney disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation were also taken into account.

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