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Early sex puts adolescents at high infection risk

Gorkha Post



SEOUL — Teenagers who experience their first sex at an early age run a more serious danger of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) which includes diseases such as gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia, HIV or other infection, warns a study.

Sexually transmitted infections are major causes of medical and psychological problems globally.

For the study, the researchers from Yonsei University in Seoul used data from a Korean national survey of youth risk behaviors that is conducted annually by the Korean Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

Responses of 22,381 adolescents with sexual intercourse experience were included for the analysis.

Approximately 7.4 percent of boys and 7.5 percent of girls reported having STI. The researchers found that for both boys and girls, the chance of experiencing STIs increased as the age of first sexual intercourse decreased.

“This study shows that earlier initiation of sexual intercourse increases the odds of experiencing STIs,” the researchers said.

“Also as the age gap gets shorter, the odds of experiencing STIs increase. Our study suggests that it is important to consider the time period of first sexual intercourse and to reinforce a monitoring system along with the development of other preventive strategies,” the study said.

Compared to teens who had first intercourse in 12th grade, those whose first experience was in seventh grade were three times more likely to have had an STI, reported.

The findings appeared in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.


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Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk

IANS Indo Asian News Service




Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk. Representational Image

NEW YORK — People who are suffering from urinary or respiratory tract infections may face nearly double the risk of heart attacks and strokes than obesity, researchers have warned.

The study — led by a researcher of Indian origin — found that if the frequency of these common infections causing hospitalisation continues for a longer period it may even lead to death.

Patients diagnosed with any one of these common infections were three times more likely to die than those without prior infection after developing heart disease, and almost twice as likely to die if they had a stroke.

“Our figures suggest that those who are admitted to hospital with a respiratory or urinary tract infection are 40 per cent more likely to suffer a subsequent heart attack, and 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke, than patients who have had no such infection, and are considerably less likely to survive from these conditions,” Rahul Potluri, researcher at Britain’s Aston University, said in a statement.

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The effects of the common infections were of similar magnitude among the people suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol, researchers said.

“It is notable that infection appears to confer as much, if not more, of a risk for future heart disease and stroke as very well established risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes,” Potluri added.

Researchers conducted the study over 34,027 patients who had been admitted with a urinary or respiratory tract infection with an age and sex-matched control group without infection.

Factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, obesity and tobacco use, as well as medical conditions including excess cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and kidney disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation were also taken into account.

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