Connect with us

Health

Early breast cancer may identify with urine test

Gorkha Post

Published

on

BERLIN — A new test that recognizes changes in cell metabolism system through urine tests may identify breast cancer early, researchers say.

According to the findings, published in the journal BMC Cancer, researchers at the University of Freiburg in Germany have developed a technique that involves determining the concentration of molecules that regulate cell metabolism which are often deregulated in cancer cells.

These molecules, referred to as microRNAs, enter into the urine over the blood. By deciding the structure of microRNAs in the urine, the researchers succeeded in setting up with 91 for percent accuracy whether a test subject was healthy or diseased.

The measurement was possible through the discovery of only four microRNAs.

If the effectiveness of the method is confirmed in further studies, it could serve later on as a method for checking the achievement of treatment and possibly also of making an early determination of breast cancer, researchers said.
Currently, researchers have made breast cancer diagnosis by mammography or ultrasound and confirmed it with tissue tests.

However, these methods have been subject to recurring criticism due to radiation exposure, erroneous results, and the fact that they involve an invasive intervention.

ALSO READ :  Depression affects 20 percent of young adults with autism

In the study, Dr Elmar Stickeler, medical director of Senology at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and head of the Breast Center at the Medical Center and his team measured the concentrations of nine microRNAs in the urine, short genetic sequences that regulate cell metabolism.

Four of the nine molecules exhibited significant differences in concentration between healthy and diseased test subjects.

“We discovered that the microRNA profile in the urine is modified in a characteristic way in the urine of test subjects with breast cancer,” said Stickeler.

“MicroRNAs should thus be suitable in principle for a breast cancer test,” Stickeler said.

Continue Reading

Health

Diabetes drug might ease heart failure risk

Gorkha Post

Published

on

A new research has showed that the diabetes drug Farxiga might do double-duty for patients, helping to ward off another killer, heart failure.

According to the findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with their presentation at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association in Chicago, Type 2 diabetics who took Farxiga saw their odds of hospitalization for heart failure drop by 27 percent compared to those who took a placebo.

Farxiga is a type of drug called a SGLT2 inhibitor. The compound is called dapagliflozin.

The study included more than 17,000 type 2 diabetes patients aged 40 and older. Nearly 7,000 had heart disease and more than 10,000 had numerous risk factors for heart disease, Wiviott’s group said.

Patients were randomly assigned to take a dummy placebo pill or 10 milligrams of Farxiga each day.

ALSO READ :  Telemedicine center becomes effective at Phalebas

“When it comes to helping our patients control and manage blood glucose, the ‘how’ appears to be as important [as] the ‘how much,” said study author Dr Stephen Wiviott, a cardiovascular medicine specialist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

“When choosing a therapy, trial results like these can help us make an informed decision about what treatments are not only safe and effective for lowering blood glucose but can also reduce risk of heart and kidney complications,” Wiviott said in a hospital news release.

Taking the drug did not reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular-related death, the research team noted. However, patients who took the drug did see healthy declines in their blood sugar levels, plus an added bonus: a 27 percent decrease in their risk of hospitalization for heart failure.

Their risk of kidney failure and death from kidney failure also fell, researchers noted.

Two other recent studies of this class of drugs show that they “robustly and consistently improve heart and kidney outcomes in a broad population of patients with diabetes,” Wiviott noted.

With Inputs from HealthDay

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS