Connect with us

Health

Drinking daily carbonated beverages may cause ‘early puberty’, increase ‘breast cancer’ risks in girls

Gorkha Post

Published

on

A new study has found that drinking daily carbonated beverages may cause puberty in girls as well increase breast cancer too.

According to report by the Mirror, the study at Harvard Medical School found that around half of a liter a day of sugary cola, lemonade or other fizzy beverages causes early puberty and increases breast cancer chances in young ladies by 5 percent for every year they mature earlier.

Drinks with included sugar increase insulin concentration in the body, prompting higher convergences of sex hormones, which are typically connected with periods beginning earlier, a condition that is on the rise in developed countries.

ALSO READ :  Depression affects 20 percent of young adults with autism

Researcher Karin Michels said that their study adds to increasing concern about the boundless utilization of sugar-sweetened beverages among youngsters.

Michels added that unlike most other predictors, sugar-sweetened refreshments consumption can be modified and this research shows that it’s considerably more critical that kids switch to water.

Continue Reading

Health

Sudden cardiac arrests are more likely to happen on any day at any time : Study

Raghu Kshitiz

Published

on

Representationa image

A new study has showed that sudden cardiac arrests are more likely to happen on any day at any time, challenging previous claims that weekday mornings — especially Mondays — were the danger zones.

Previously heart experts have long believed that weekday mornings were the danger zones for unexpected deaths from sudden cardiac arrests.

“While there are likely several reasons to explain why more cardiac arrests happen outside of previously identified peak times, stress is likely a major factor,” said Sumeet Chugh, a Professor of medicine from the Smidt Heart Institute in the US.

“We now live in a fast-paced, ‘always on’ era that causes increased psycho-social stress and possibly an increase in the likelihood of sudden cardiac arrest,” Chugh added.

Almost 17 million cardiac deaths occur annually worldwide while the survival rate from sudden cardiac arrest is less than one per cent.

ALSO READ :  Depression affects 20 percent of young adults with autism

For the study, published in the journal Heart Rhythm, Chugh’s team analysed data on 1,535 from the community-based Oregon Sudden Unexpected Death Study between 2004 to 2014, among which only 13.9 per cent died in the early morning hours, the findings revealed.

All reported cases were based on emergency medical service reports containing detailed information regarding the cause of the cardiac arrest.

“Because sudden cardiac arrest is usually fatal, we have to prevent it before it strikes,” Chugh said. “Our next steps are to conclusively determine the underlying reasons behind this shift, then identify public health implications as a result,” he added.

Apart from stress, other contributing factors may be a shift in how high-risk patients are being treated, as well as inadequacies in how past studies have measured time of death caused by sudden cardiac arrest.

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS