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Drinking daily carbonated beverages may cause ‘early puberty’, increase ‘breast cancer’ risks in girls

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A new study has found that drinking daily carbonated beverages may cause puberty in girls as well increase breast cancer too.

According to report by the Mirror, the study at Harvard Medical School found that around half of a liter a day of sugary cola, lemonade or other fizzy beverages causes early puberty and increases breast cancer chances in young ladies by 5 percent for every year they mature earlier.

Drinks with included sugar increase insulin concentration in the body, prompting higher convergences of sex hormones, which are typically connected with periods beginning earlier, a condition that is on the rise in developed countries.

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Researcher Karin Michels said that their study adds to increasing concern about the boundless utilization of sugar-sweetened beverages among youngsters.

Michels added that unlike most other predictors, sugar-sweetened refreshments consumption can be modified and this research shows that it’s considerably more critical that kids switch to water.

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Single blood test might be enough to diagnose diabetes

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A new study report has suggested that it may be possible to diagnose type 2 diabetes by measuring fasting blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) using the same blood sample without requiring a patient to come back for a second visit and saving patients time and health care cost.

The findings, from the prospective Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, were published online June 19 in Annals of Internal Medicine by Elizabeth Selvin, PhD, of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, and colleagues.

Until now, it’s recommended that a blood test focused on elevated fasting levels of blood sugar (glucose) or a blood component called glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) be confirmed with a second blood test at a follow-up visit which takes time and money and could still result in missed diagnoses, said a team from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.

In the new study, researchers led by Hopkins epidemiologist Elizabeth Selvin looked at data on more than 13,000 people in a long-running US heart disease study. The study began in the 1980s, and along the way has recorded valuable data from participants, including diabetes test data.

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The team analyzed that data, and reported that a positive result for glucose and HbA1c from just a single blood sample can confirm type 2 diabetes.

” This could change care potentially allowing a major simplification of current clinical practice guidelines,” Selvin said in a university news release.

“Doctors are already doing these [glucose and HbA1c] tests together — if a patient is obese, for example, and has other risk factors for diabetes, the physician is likely to order tests for both glucose and HbA1c from a single blood sample.

“It’s just that the guidelines don’t clearly let you use the tests from that one blood sample to make the initial diabetes diagnosis,” she explained.

“I’m hoping that these results will lead to a change in the clinical guidelines when they are revised in early 2019, which could make identifying diabetes a lot more efficient in many cases,” Selvin said.

Diabetes experts welcomed the findings.

With Agency Inputs

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