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Crying makes feel better, says study

Gorkha Post




A new study has claimed that a decent crying can indeed make people feel better. The study, published in Springer’s journal Motivation and Emotion, has found that watching tragedy movies enhanced the mind-sets of viewers one and half hour after the films ended.

For the study, Asmir Gracanin of the University of Tilburg in the Netherlands and his team recorded a group of participants while watching the emotionally charged films Life Is Beautiful (La vita e bella) and Hachi: A Dog’s Tale.

A short time later, the participants were asked a few times to reflect on how they felt.

Researchers examined both the immediate and the delayed effect of crying on mood within a controlled laboratory setting. The two films shown to 60 participants are known to be tearjerkers, PTI reported.

Immediately afterwards, the 28 participants who cried and the 32 who didn’t shed a tear were asked how they felt. They also had to rate their moods 20 and 90 minutes later.

The mood of the non-criers was unchanged and unaffected immediately after seeing the films. The mood of the criers, on the other hand, was distinctively low and even took a dip.

Within 20 minutes, however, their mood had returned to the level reported before the screening.

Finally, after 90 minutes, the criers reported even a better mood than was the case before the films started. Such a mood shift was not tied to the number of times that a person cried during the films.

According to Gracanin, it’s this dip and subsequent return of emotions to previous levels that might make criers feel as if they are in a much better mood after they have shed some tears.

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The study found that it seemed the criers even experience a general mood increase, but only after a longer period of time.

“After the initial deterioration of mood following crying, it takes some time for the mood not only to recover but also to be lifted above the levels at which it had been before the emotional event,” Gracanin said.

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Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk

IANS Indo Asian News Service




Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk. Representational Image

NEW YORK — People who are suffering from urinary or respiratory tract infections may face nearly double the risk of heart attacks and strokes than obesity, researchers have warned.

The study — led by a researcher of Indian origin — found that if the frequency of these common infections causing hospitalisation continues for a longer period it may even lead to death.

Patients diagnosed with any one of these common infections were three times more likely to die than those without prior infection after developing heart disease, and almost twice as likely to die if they had a stroke.

“Our figures suggest that those who are admitted to hospital with a respiratory or urinary tract infection are 40 per cent more likely to suffer a subsequent heart attack, and 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke, than patients who have had no such infection, and are considerably less likely to survive from these conditions,” Rahul Potluri, researcher at Britain’s Aston University, said in a statement.

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The effects of the common infections were of similar magnitude among the people suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol, researchers said.

“It is notable that infection appears to confer as much, if not more, of a risk for future heart disease and stroke as very well established risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes,” Potluri added.

Researchers conducted the study over 34,027 patients who had been admitted with a urinary or respiratory tract infection with an age and sex-matched control group without infection.

Factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, obesity and tobacco use, as well as medical conditions including excess cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and kidney disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation were also taken into account.

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