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Broccoli, soybeans may cut breast cancer treatment’s side effects

Raghu Kshitiz

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NEW YORK — Consuming cruciferous vegetables (such as cabbages, kale, collard greens, bokchoy, Brussels sprouts, and broccoli) and foods (such as soy milk, tofu and edamame) might assist reduction in common side effects of breast cancer treatment in breast cancer survivors, say a team of scientists led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Higher intake of cruciferous vegetables and soy foods were associated with fewer reports of menopausal symptoms while higher soy intake was also associated with less reported fatigue.

In the study, published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, the breast cancer survivors included 173 non-Hispanic white and 192 Chinese Americans including US-born Chinese and Chinese immigrants.

Researchers say breast cancer survivors often experience side effects from cancer treatments that can persist months or years after completion of treatment because many treatments designed to prevent breast cancer recurrence inhibit the body’s production or use of estrogen, the hormone that can fuel breast cancer growth, breast cancer patients often experience hot flashes and night sweats, among other side effects.

While further research is needed in larger study populations and with more detailed dietary data, this project addresses an important gap in research on the possible role of lifestyle factors, such as dietary habits, in relation to side effects of treatments, said Sarah Oppeneer Nomura, PhD, of Georgetown Lombardi, the lead author on the study.

“These symptoms can adversely impact survivors’ quality of life and can lead them to stopping ongoing treatments, she says adding, “Understanding the role of life style factors is important because diet can serve as a modifiable target for possibly reducing symptoms among breast cancer survivors.”

When study participants were evaluated separately by race,ethnicity, associations were significant among white breast cancer survivors; however, while a trend was seen in the benefit for Chinese women, results were not statically significant.

Researchers explain Chinese women typically report fewer menopausal symptoms. Most of them also consume cruciferous vegetables and soy foods, making it difficult to see a significant effect in this subgroup. Indeed, in this study, Chinese breast cancer survivors ate more than twice as much soy and cruciferous vegetables.

Phytochemicals, or bioactive meals elements, reminiscent of isoflavones in soy meals and glucosinolates in cruciferous greens would be the supply of the profit, the researchers stated.

Whether the reduction in symptoms accounts for longtime use of soy and cruciferous vegetables needs further investigation, says the study’s senior author, Judy Huei-yu Wang, PhD, of Georgetown Lombardi’s Cancer Prevention and Control Program.

The research addresses an vital hole in analysis on the doable function of life-style elements, reminiscent of dietary habits, in relation to unintended effects of therapies, stated lead creator Sarah Oppeneer.

With Agency Inputs

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Attorney General Kharel directs police to file a case to seek life imprisonment to rapists

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DHANUSA— Attorney General Agni Prasad Kharel has directed the police department to file a case seeking life imprisonment to the men arrested for raping and murdering 10-year-old girl Manika Yadav along with confiscation of all property.

He made this direction to Superintendent of Police Gobinda Thapaliya during an inspection of the office of district government advocate and high government advocate office in Janakpur.

Kharel also met Manika’s family at Aaurahi Rural Municipality.

During the meeting, he assured the bereaved family of action against the rapists and economic help to them.

The Dhanusa police have arrested Binod Mukhiya and Nathuni Pandit from the locality on the charge of raping Manika.

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