Connect with us

Life Style

British Columbia ends high heel dress codes in workplaces

Published

on

The Canadian province of British Columbia has banned workplace requirements that force women to wear high heels.

Provincial government has announced Friday it had amended its legislation in order to prevent mandatory high heel policies in the workplace after the leader of British Columbia’s Green Party, Andrew Weaver, pushed for the change on International Women’s Day.

A mandatory high-heel dress code “is a workplace health and safety issue,” says the release put out by Premier Christy Clark and Labour Minister Shirley Bond.

“There is a risk of physical injury from slipping or falling, as well as possible damage to the feet, legs and back from prolonged wearing of high heels while at work,” the pair said in a press release.

“Forcing female employees to wear high-heeled shoes, especially when their male colleagues are wearing flat shoes, is archaic and this change is clearly overdue.”

The province’s Workers Compensation Act was amended to “ensure that workplace footwear is of a design, construction and material that allows the worker to safely perform their work and ensures that employers cannot require footwear contrary to this standard.”

The new amendments will require employers to consider safety hazards such as slipping, tripping, musculoskeletal injury, and other factors when determining the dress code for their employees.

 

Agencies

Continue Reading

Health

Kidney disease may up risk of diabetes

Published

on

Kidney disease may up risk of diabetes. Representational image.

KATHMANDU — It is known that diabetes increase a person’s risk of kidney disease. But, now a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true which means Kidney dysfunction also increases the risk of diabetes.

The researchers deduced that a likely culprit of the two-way relationship between kidney disease and diabetes is urea. The risk may be attributed to the rising level of urea — the nitrogen-containing waste product in blood, which comes from the breakdown of protein in foods.

“We have known for a long time that diabetes is a major risk factor for kidney disease, but now we have a better understanding that kidney disease, through elevated levels of urea, also raises the risk of diabetes,” said the Ziyad Al-Aly, Assistant Professor at the Washington University in St. Louis.

The nitrogen-containing waste product in blood comes from the breakdown of protein in foods. Kidneys normally remove urea from the blood, but it can build up when kidney function slows down.

Kidneys normally remove urea from the blood, but it can build up when kidney function slows down, resulting in greater insulin resistance as well as secretion in the body.

ALSO READ :  Kuwaiti police detain a woman for filming her maid's suicide attempt

“When urea builds up in the blood because of kidney dysfunction, it often results in increased insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion,” Ziyad added.

The findings are significant because urea levels can be lowered through medication, diet — for example, by eating less protein — and other means, thereby allowing for improved treatment and possible prevention of diabetes, the researchers said.

For the study, the team evaluated the records of 1.3 million adults without diabetes over a five-year period, beginning in 2003.

Out of these, 117,000 of those without diabetes — or 9 per cent — had elevated urea levels, signalling poor kidney function and were at 23 per cent higher risk of developing diabetes .

The study, conducted in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System, is published December 11 in Kidney International journal.

Continue Reading
Advertisement Cheap Air fare and package tours!
Advertisement
Advertisement Miss Gorkha  2017

LATEST TWEET

TOP PICKS