Connect with us

Health

BMI linked to blood pressure

Gorkha Post

Published

on

WASHINGTON — Body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure are positively associated, according to a new study being conducted by researchers at the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) in China.

In the ongoing study of 1.7 million Chinese men and women, individuals who were not taking an antihypertensive medication, were observed with an increase of 0.8 to 1.7 mm Hg (kg/m2) in blood pressure per additional unit of BMI.

First author and doctoral candidate at Yale, George Linderman said, “The enormous size of the dataset — the result of an unprecedented effort in China — allows us to characterize this relationship between BMI and blood pressure across tens of thousands of subgroups, which simply would not be possible in a smaller study.”

Researchers recorded the participants’ blood pressure from September 2014 through June 2017 as part of the larger China Patient-Centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE) Million Persons Project, which captures at least 22,000 subgroups of people based on age (35-80), sex, race/ethnicity, geography, occupation, and other pertinent characteristics — such as whether or not they are on antihypertensive medication.

ALSO READ :  99-year-old Australian swimmer breaks freestyle world record

Senior author on the study Harlan Krumholz said, “If trends in overweight and obesity continue in China, the implication of our study is that hypertension, already a major risk factor, is likely to become even more important. This paper is ringing the bell that the time is now to focus on these risk factors.”

According to the researchers, one way for the Chinese healthcare system to address these risk factors would be the management of high blood pressure with antihypertensive drugs.

The full findings are present in the journal-JAMA Network Open.

ANI

Continue Reading

Health

Suicide can’t be predicted by asking about suicidal thoughts : Study

Gorkha Post

Published

on

Most people who died of suicide deny they experience suicidal thoughts when asked by doctors in the weeks and months leading up to their death, a major Australian study has found.

The findings, co-authored by clinical psychiatrist and Professor Matthew Large from UNSW’s School of Psychiatry, Sydney that published in the journal BJPsych Open The meta-analysis challenge the widely-held assumption that psychiatrists can predict who will suicide by asking if they are preoccupied with thoughts of killing themselves.

The study showed that 80% of patients who were not undergoing psychiatric treatment and who died of suicide reported not to have suicidal thoughts when asked by their psychiatrist or GP.

“If you meet someone who has suicidal ideation there is a 98 per cent chance that they are not going to suicide,” said Professor Large, an international expert on suicide risk assessment who also works in the emergency department of a major Sydney hospital.

ALSO READ :  Early sex puts adolescents at high infection risk

“But what we didn’t know was how frequently people who go on to suicide have denied having suicidal thoughts when asked directly,” he added.

“This study proves we can no longer ration psychiatric care based on the presence of suicidal thoughts alone. We need to provide high-quality, patient-centred care for everyone experiencing mental illness, whether or not they reveal they are experiencing suicidal thoughts,” Professor Large said.

About one in 10 people will have suicidal ideation in their lifetime. But the study showed suicidal ideation alone was not rational grounds for deciding who gets treatment and who does not, Professor Large said.

“We know that suicide feeling is pretty common and that suicide is actually a rare event, even among people with severe mental illness,” Professor Large added.

Suicidal ideation tells us an awful lot about how a person is feeling, their psychological distress, sometimes their diagnosis and their need for treatment but it’s not a meaningful test of future behaviour.

Suicidal feelings can fluctuate rapidly and people may suicide very impulsively after only a short period of suicidal thoughts.

But, people had good reasons not to disclose thoughts of suicide, fearing stigma, triggering over-reactions or upsetting family and friends, and being involuntarily admitted for psychiatric treatment, Professor Large said.

Professor Large emphasized that clinicians should not assume that patients experiencing mental distress without reporting suicidal ideas were not at elevated risk of suicide.

Continue Reading

TOP PICKS