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Bisexual relationship can break your heart, literally

Gorkha Post

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WASHINGTON — Turns out, for men, being bisexual can be injurious to health.

According to a study conducted by the New York University, bisexual men have a higher risk for heart disease compared with heterosexual men across several modifiable risk factors.

“Our findings highlight the impact of sexual orientation, specifically sexual identity, on the cardiovascular health of men and suggest clinicians and public health practitioners should develop tailored screening and prevention to reduce heart disease risk in bisexual men,” said lead author Billy Caceres.

Little is known about the impact of sexual orientation on heart disease risk in men, despite the fact that gay and bisexual men may be at a higher risk based on modifiable factors like tobacco use and poor mental health.

In this study, the researchers examined differences in modifiable risk factors for heart disease and heart disease diagnoses in men of different sexual orientations.

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Risk factors measured included mental distress; health behaviors such as tobacco use, binge drinking, diet, and exercise; and biological risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cholesterol.

Participants who reported having angina, coronary heart disease, heart failure, heart attack, or stroke were considered as having a diagnosis of heart disease.

The researchers analysed responses from 7,731 men ages 20 to 59. Differences were analysed across four groups based on their sexual identities: gay men, bisexual men, heterosexual men who have sex with men, and heterosexual men.

The researchers found no differences in heart disease diagnoses based on sexual orientation, but the risk for heart disease was more complicated. Gay men, heterosexual men, and heterosexual men who have sex with men had similar heart disease risk.

Gay men reported lower binge drinking compared with heterosexual men, but otherwise few differences in health behaviors were noted.

Bisexual men, however, had higher rates of several risk factors for heart disease relative to heterosexual men: mental distress, obesity, elevated blood pressure, and three different measures of diabetes (medication use, medical history, and average glycosylated hemoglobin level).

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“Poor mental health is a recognized risk factor for the development of heart disease,” said Caceres. “Clinicians should be educated about sexual minority health and should routinely screen bisexual men for mental distress as a risk factor for heart disease.

This is particularly important as healthcare organizations increasingly include sexual orientation as part of demographic questionnaires in electronic health records.”

The researchers also noted that the study underscores the importance of disaggregating analyses for gay and bisexual participants to ascertain differences in health outcomes between these subgroups.

The study findings appear in the journal LGBT Health.

ANI

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Men, women process feelings differently

Gorkha Post

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WASHINGTON — Swiss researchers have revealed an alternative of how men and women’s brain work differently as it has long been said that both brains is wired in a different way.

A large- scale study by a research team at the University of Basel focused on deciding the gender-dependent relationship between feelings, memory performance and brain activity.

With the help of 3,398 test subjects from four sub-trials, the researchers were able to demonstrate that females rated emotional image content – particularly negative content – as more emotionally stimulating than their male partners did.

In the case of natural images, however, there were no gender-related differences in emotional appraisal. In a consequent memory test, female participants could freely recall fundamentally a larger number of pictures than the male participants.

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Surprisingly however, women had a specific preference over men when reviewing positive pictures. “This would suggest that gender-dependent differences in emotional processing and memory are due to different mechanisms,” says study leader Dr Annette Milnik.

Using fMRI information from 696 test subjects, the researchers were also able to show that stronger appraisal of negative emotional image content by the female participants is connected to expanded brain action in motoric regions. The result would support the common belief that women were more sincerely expressive than men, clarified Dr Klara Spalek, lead author of the study.

This study is important, because many neuropsychiatric diseases also show gender-related differences.

The results will be published in the latest issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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