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Ashley Madison CEO steps down after security breach

Gorkha Post

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TORONTO —

The CEO of cheating web site Ashley Madison has stepped down after hackers released its members list on the web.

Parent company Avid Life Media said it and CEO Noel Biderman were in were in “mutual agreement” about the split.

“This change is in the best interest of the company and allows us to continue to provide support to our members and dedicated employees,” Avid Life Media said.

Meanwhile, the firm is “adjusting to the attack on our business and members’ privacy by criminals”, the company said, vowing uninterrupted member access to its website.
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Other senior managers will step in to fill the void left by Mr Biderman’s departure until a new boss is appointed, Avid Life Media said in a statement.

A hacker group identified as the “Impact Team” last week released emails and user account information of members stolen from the company’s servers, as well as corporate emails and sensitive computer source code.

Canadian police have said two suicides may be linked to the leak of the website’s 32 million members’ personal data.

– AFP

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Health

Regular bedtime beneficial for heart and metabolic health among older adults

Raghu Kshitiz

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KATHMANDU — Sufficient sleep has been proven to help keep the body healthy and the mind sharp. But a new study on sleep patterns has suggested that a regular bedtime and wake time are just as important for heart and metabolic health among older adults too.

Researchers at Duke Health and the Duke Clinical Research Institute, in a study of 1,978 older adults, have found that people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every day.

The study  was published Sept 21 in the journal Scientific Reports.

“From our study, we can’t conclude that sleep irregularity results in health risks, or whether health conditions affect sleep,” said study’s lead author Jessica Lunsford-Avery.

“Perhaps all of these things are impacting each other.”

African-Americans had the most irregular sleep patterns compared to participants who were white, Chinese-American or Hispanic, the data showed.

Still, the data suggest tracking sleep regularity could help identify people at risk of disease, and where health disparities may impact specific groups.

Irregular sleepers were also more likely to report depression and stress than regular sleepers, both of which are tied to heart health.

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