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Around 30,000 South Korean women protest spy cams

Gorkha Post

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SEOUL — Some 30,000 South Korean women — in the biggest women’s rights march in the country’s history — took to the streets of Seoul on Saturday protesting against illegal filming and photography with spy cameras, as well as police gender discrimination when it comes to probes into sexual crimes.

The participants, many of them wearing masks for fear of exposure, marched from Hyehwa Station in South Korean capital of Seoul, to protest what they say is a lackluster response of law enforcement to men spying on unsuspecting female victims in public bathrooms, on crowded trains, buses and in other public places with hidden cameras, the Yonhap news agency reported.

Saturday’s rally is the second time in two months that women have hit the streets to protest the impunity of the perpetrators of such crimes, who are predominantly male.

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The rally organizers said in a press release on Friday that it was common “for Korean women to be exposed to illegal filming anytime and anywhere, and to deal with negligent police investigation, secondary harm, and the obscene expressions by the press.”

A similar rally on May 19, drew in at least 12,000 women. Just like on Saturday, the demonstrators were covering their faces with masks and printed camera images.

The current wave of protests was sparked by an incident in early May, when a woman was arrested for filming and spreading the image of a nude male model posing for an art class at Hongik University.

Police acted swiftly and not only brought the suspect to justice, but also paraded her in front of the media, albeit, with her face covered. The case became the last straw for many women, who saw gender bias in the police’s zealousness.

Agencies

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Magnitude 8.2 quake rattles Fiji

Thompson Reuters

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A massive quake of magnitude 8.2 struck in the Pacific Ocean close to Fiji and Tonga on Sunday but it was so deep that it was not expected to cause any damage, the US Geological Survey (USGS) said.

The US Tsunami Warning Center also said the quake was too deep to cause a tsunami.

The quake was 347.7 miles (560 km) below the Earth which would have dampened the shaking at the surface.

“I would not expect any damage. People will feel it but it’s so deep that I would not expect any damage,” USGS geophysicist Jana Pursley said by telephone.

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The quake was initially reported as a magnitude 8.0 and then upgraded to 8.2, a magnitude that could cause tremendous damage had it not been so deep.

The epicenter was located 167 miles (270 km) east of Levuka in Fiji and 275 miles (443 km) west of Neiafu in Tonga.

The area is located on the earthquake-prone Ring of Fire.

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