Connect with us


An orgasm a day could keep prostate cancer at bay

Gorkha Post



LONDON — A recent study has pointed out that men, who have an orgasm every day, have a lower risk of prostate cancer than men who do not ejaculate regularly, according to a new study.

The study showed that men who ejaculated more than 21 times a month had a 22 per cent lower risk of getting the disease, the Mirror reported.

The study doesn’t give any reasons why the practice of ejaculation may help to stave off prostate cancer, but there are theories which have been made public previously.

Jennifer Rider of Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, said that while these data are the most compelling to date on the potential benefit of ejaculation on prostate cancer development, they are observational data and should be interpreted somewhat cautiously.

She added “At the same time, given the lack of modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer, the results of this study are particularly encouraging.”

According to the World Cancer Research Fund International, in 2012, there were more than 1.1 million cases of prostate cancer, making it accountable for 8 percent of all new cancer cases, and 15 percent of cancers in men.


Continue Reading


Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk

IANS Indo Asian News Service




Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk. Representational Image

NEW YORK — People who are suffering from urinary or respiratory tract infections may face nearly double the risk of heart attacks and strokes than obesity, researchers have warned.

The study — led by a researcher of Indian origin — found that if the frequency of these common infections causing hospitalisation continues for a longer period it may even lead to death.

Patients diagnosed with any one of these common infections were three times more likely to die than those without prior infection after developing heart disease, and almost twice as likely to die if they had a stroke.

“Our figures suggest that those who are admitted to hospital with a respiratory or urinary tract infection are 40 per cent more likely to suffer a subsequent heart attack, and 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke, than patients who have had no such infection, and are considerably less likely to survive from these conditions,” Rahul Potluri, researcher at Britain’s Aston University, said in a statement.

ALSO READ :  Extreme mental stress lowers ability to bear physical pain: study

The effects of the common infections were of similar magnitude among the people suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol, researchers said.

“It is notable that infection appears to confer as much, if not more, of a risk for future heart disease and stroke as very well established risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes,” Potluri added.

Researchers conducted the study over 34,027 patients who had been admitted with a urinary or respiratory tract infection with an age and sex-matched control group without infection.

Factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, obesity and tobacco use, as well as medical conditions including excess cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and kidney disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation were also taken into account.

Continue Reading