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60 percent fund in impoverished citizen treatment fund goes to kidney patients




KATHMANDU — Of the total budget that the government allocates every year to provide financial assistance for the treatment of eight types of chronic diseases, 60 per cent is being spent for kidney-related diseases.

Heart, kidney, cancer, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, head injury, spinal injury and sickle cell anemia patients get monetary assistance Rs 100 thousands from the government for treatment.

According to the Management Division at the Department of Health Services, dialysis service for kidney patients is free, Rs 400 thousands is given for kidney transplantation and Rs 100 thousands for post-transplant medication and treatment.

Prakash Ghimire, senior assistant health worker at the Division’s Impoverished Citizen Treatment Fund, said that both donor and receiver receive Rs 50 thousands for laboratory tests.

The government is spending more in the management of kidney diseases than other chronic diseases. Besides, patient of an acute renal failure is given Rs 100 thousands as medication cost.

The government set aside more than one billion rupees in the current fiscal year for the Division that regulates the Impoverished Citizen Treatment Fund.

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Senior AHO Ghimire stated that this amount was insufficient and drew the attention of the concerned authority to add another Rs 1 billion to render free healthcare to the poverty-stricken citizens.

He said, “The hospitals where the impoverished citizens could avail health care for free of cost are increasing. The number of patients would grow accordingly. Hence the amount allocated for the same is insufficient.”

The number of patients availing dialysis for kidney stands at 23,000 currently. The treatment for a kidney patient costs from Rs 40,000 to Rs 50,000 a month on average. The government has been contributing Rs 30,000 for the same.

The government had allocated Rs 1.2 billion under this heading in the fiscal year 2072/073 and Rs 1.33 billion the next fiscal year.

A majority of this budget went for the treatment of kidney patients followed by the cancer and heart patients, Ghimire shared.

A total of 17,867 patients were benefitted by the assistance from the Fund as of now in the current fiscal year 2073/074.

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Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk

IANS Indo Asian News Service




Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk. Representational Image

NEW YORK — People who are suffering from urinary or respiratory tract infections may face nearly double the risk of heart attacks and strokes than obesity, researchers have warned.

The study — led by a researcher of Indian origin — found that if the frequency of these common infections causing hospitalisation continues for a longer period it may even lead to death.

Patients diagnosed with any one of these common infections were three times more likely to die than those without prior infection after developing heart disease, and almost twice as likely to die if they had a stroke.

“Our figures suggest that those who are admitted to hospital with a respiratory or urinary tract infection are 40 per cent more likely to suffer a subsequent heart attack, and 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke, than patients who have had no such infection, and are considerably less likely to survive from these conditions,” Rahul Potluri, researcher at Britain’s Aston University, said in a statement.

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The effects of the common infections were of similar magnitude among the people suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol, researchers said.

“It is notable that infection appears to confer as much, if not more, of a risk for future heart disease and stroke as very well established risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes,” Potluri added.

Researchers conducted the study over 34,027 patients who had been admitted with a urinary or respiratory tract infection with an age and sex-matched control group without infection.

Factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, obesity and tobacco use, as well as medical conditions including excess cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and kidney disease, heart failure and atrial fibrillation were also taken into account.

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