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48 districts get full immunisation status

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ROLPA — Full immunisation has been guaranteed in forty-eight districts of the country. This information was shared at a programme organised in district headquarters Libang, on Monday, to declare Rolpa district as achieving this status.

Minister for Social Development of Province 5 government, Sudarshan Baral, declared that Rolpa had joined the league of districts where full immunisation has been guaranteed.

He highlighted the importance of immunisation for improving the health condition of citizens. The provincial government minister said only healthy citizens could contribute meaningfully to country’s development.

Rolpa was declared achieving the status of ‘full immunisation’ as all children below the age of 15 months in the district have been administered 11 various immunisation shots as per the immunisation schedule.

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With this, Rolpa has achieved 95 per cent immunisation, Chief of District Public Health Office, Dr Sushil Acharya, said on the occasion.

Representative of the Department of Health Services, Basanta Shrestha, said on the occasion that all 77 districts of the country would be declared ‘district with full immunisation’ within 2018.

Meanwhile, Baglung has also been declared as achieving the status of ‘district with full immunisation’. This announcement was made at a programme organised in the district headquarters on Monday.

On the occasion, Minister for Social Development of Gandaki Province, Naradevi Pun Magar, provincial assembly members, people’s representatives of local bodies, political party chiefs of the district, among other officials signed on a pledge to make Baglung continue with the status.

Similarly, Lahan Municipality in Siraha district has been declared ‘municipality achieving full immunisation’ amidst a programme in Lahan on Monday.

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Suicide can’t be predicted by asking about suicidal thoughts : Study

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Most people who died of suicide deny they experience suicidal thoughts when asked by doctors in the weeks and months leading up to their death, a major Australian study has found.

The findings, co-authored by clinical psychiatrist and Professor Matthew Large from UNSW’s School of Psychiatry, Sydney that published in the journal BJPsych Open The meta-analysis challenge the widely-held assumption that psychiatrists can predict who will suicide by asking if they are preoccupied with thoughts of killing themselves.

The study showed that 80% of patients who were not undergoing psychiatric treatment and who died of suicide reported not to have suicidal thoughts when asked by their psychiatrist or GP.

“If you meet someone who has suicidal ideation there is a 98 per cent chance that they are not going to suicide,” said Professor Large, an international expert on suicide risk assessment who also works in the emergency department of a major Sydney hospital.

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“But what we didn’t know was how frequently people who go on to suicide have denied having suicidal thoughts when asked directly,” he added.

“This study proves we can no longer ration psychiatric care based on the presence of suicidal thoughts alone. We need to provide high-quality, patient-centred care for everyone experiencing mental illness, whether or not they reveal they are experiencing suicidal thoughts,” Professor Large said.

About one in 10 people will have suicidal ideation in their lifetime. But the study showed suicidal ideation alone was not rational grounds for deciding who gets treatment and who does not, Professor Large said.

“We know that suicide feeling is pretty common and that suicide is actually a rare event, even among people with severe mental illness,” Professor Large added.

Suicidal ideation tells us an awful lot about how a person is feeling, their psychological distress, sometimes their diagnosis and their need for treatment but it’s not a meaningful test of future behaviour.

Suicidal feelings can fluctuate rapidly and people may suicide very impulsively after only a short period of suicidal thoughts.

But, people had good reasons not to disclose thoughts of suicide, fearing stigma, triggering over-reactions or upsetting family and friends, and being involuntarily admitted for psychiatric treatment, Professor Large said.

Professor Large emphasized that clinicians should not assume that patients experiencing mental distress without reporting suicidal ideas were not at elevated risk of suicide.

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