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30 minutes of exercise 5 days a week linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Raghu Kshitiz

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KATHMANDU — Exercising at least 30 minutes four or five days a week (150 mins a week) is associated with a reduced risk of death and cardiovascular disease, according to the study of physical activity tracking 130,000 people in 17 countries.

Heart failure is a chronic, progressive condition in which the heart muscle is unable to pump enough blood through to meet the body’s needs for blood and oxygen.

Though there is no cure for this condition, one can choose to lead a healthy lifestyle to lower the risk of heart failures, according to a study published in The Lancet.

Being highly active (750 mins a week) is associated with an even greater reduction, and the authors found that this was more achievable for those who built physical activity into their day through active transport, job type, or housework.

The researchers claimed that exercise could reverse damage to sedentary, ageing hearts and help to prevent the risk of future heart failure.

“Based on a series of studies performed by our team over the past five years, this ‘dose’ of exercise has become my prescription for life. I think people should be able to do this as part of their personal hygiene – just like brushing your teeth and taking a shower,” said study’s lead author Dr Benjamin Levine.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) also recommend that adults aged 18-64 years old do at least 150 minutes of moderate to intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week, as well as muscle strengthening exercises at least two days a week.

Levine noted, “When the muscle stiffens, you get high pressure and the heart chamber doesn’t fill as well with blood. In its most severe form, blood can back up into the lungs. That’s when heart failure develops.”

In the study, participants aged 35-70 years old from urban and rural areas in 17 countries across various world regions completed questionnaires on their levels of physical activity.

In the beginning of the study, each participant provided information on their socioeconomic status, lifestyle behaviors, medical history, family history of cardiovascular disease, weight, height, waist and hip measurements, and blood pressure.

They also completed a questionnaire on the types of physical activity they completed over a typical week, which the researchers used to calculate their average activity levels.

Of the 106970 people who met the activity guidelines, 3.8% developed cardiovascular disease, compared to 5.1% of people who did not (23549 people). Risk of mortality was also higher for people who did not meet the recommended amount of activity — 6.4% compared to 4.2% for people who met guidelines.

The findings suggest that, if the entire population met physical activity guidelines, 8% of deaths (equivalent to around one in 12 cases) and 4.6% of cardiovascular disease cases (almost one in 20 cases) could be prevented.

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26 rhinos die in a year in CNP

Gorkha Post

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CHITWAN — Chitwan National Park (CNP) witnessed zero poaching of endangered one-horned rhinoceros in the fiscal year 2074/75. But the death of the rhinos by natural causes has increased recently, as the park has lost a total of 26 rhinos to various causes in this period.

26 rhinos died from various reasons including natural disaster in the period, according to the CNP information officer, Nurendra Aryal.

Four rhinos were killed in flood-related incidents with two caught in a marsh caused by the flooding while two were swept away by flood waters, he informed.

Fighting, delivery complications (in case of some female rhinos) and aging are other reasons behind the deaths of a noticeable number of this endangered wildlife last fiscal year. Three female rhinos succumbed to child delivery complications in this period. They died after failing to give birth to their babies.

The park however has recorded no case of rhino poaching since April 8, 2017.However, the number of rhino deaths due to other reasons was slightly up in the year compared to the previous year, according to the CNP Information Officer Aryal.

This figure is followed by 25 and 15 rhino deaths in previous two fiscal years respectively.

The natural causes led to the death of 24 rhinos in the fiscal year 2073/74 and 15 in 2072/73.

The need of a study was felt to seek potential ways for minimising the death risk among rhinos with their death toll increasing every year, CNP chief conservation officer, Bed Kumar Dhakal said. A squad from the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation has already begun a study to this end.

The CNP latest details mentioned about 605 rhinos here.

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